Greene: Will Colorado roll out the red carpet for the gray wolf? | CanyonCourier.com

Ready or not, you could be approached by someone wielding a clipboard who wants to educate you about the Gray Wolves Initiative.

The plan will require Colorado’s Parks and Wildlife Commission to develop and implement a plan to reintroduce gray wolves to the state’s Western Slope. In 2020, voters could have the opportunity to weigh in on whether they are willing to bring back the apex predator that has been absent from Colorado since 1940.

Excitement elicited by June’s confirmed sighting of a lone wolf near the Wyoming border rippled through the state. However, many wolf biologists believe that waiting for wolves to independently return to Colorado to establish a sustainable population could take decades.

Wolves ran afoul of settlers in the early 1600s, and a bounty was declared in the colony of Massachusetts. In 1940, the last Colorado wolf was trapped and killed. But public sentiment began to pivot, and by the early 1990s, Americans began to recognize and value the wolf’s place in nature.

via Greene: Will Colorado roll out the red carpet for the gray wolf? | CanyonCourier.com

Bears, alligators and red wolves get more space to roam in North Carolina | Wildlife & Nature | pilotonline.com

Buckridge Reserve

Bears, red wolves, bald eagles and alligators just got a bigger place to roam in eastern North Carolina.

The state purchased 2,224 acres known as the Woodley Tract in Tyrrell County, enlarging the Emily and Richardson Preyer Buckridge Coastal Reserve to nearly 30,000 acres of peat soils, wetlands and forests, according to a release from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality.

The cost to the state was $520,965. The landowner donated $117,200 of the value, said state spokeswoman Patricia Smith.

The Buckridge Coastal Reserve is part of nearly 350,000 acres set aside for wildlife habitat in the region that includes three national wildlife refuges in Dare, Hyde, Tyrrell and Washington counties.

via Bears, alligators and red wolves get more space to roam in North Carolina | Wildlife & Nature | pilotonline.com

Recolonizing Gray Wolves (Canis lupus) in Northern California: Preliminary Analysis of Suitable Areas for Reoccupancy. Natural Areas Journal

Abstract

After almost a century of absence, gray wolves (Canis lupus) are beginning to recolonize California. Based on current knowledge of wolf habitat use, we developed an expert opinion model to explore the prospects for wolf recovery in Northern California. In our model, we consider the following variables: ungulate prey availability, forest canopy cover, human population density, road density, and livestock distribution. The resulting maps predict favorable wolf habitat and identify areas with high potential for wolf–human conflict in Northern California. Validation and refinement of our model will be possible once California-specific wolf distribution data becomes available. Until then, the preliminary findings from this study can inform management of this endangered species.
via Recolonizing Gray Wolves (Canis lupus) in Northern California: Preliminary Analysis of Suitable Areas for Reoccupancy

Wolf euthanized follow attack at Banff campground | Calgary Herald

The camper was inside a tent at Rampart Creek campground on the Icefields Parkway when the attack happened around 1 a.m.

The camper’s hand and arm were injured. After reporting the incident, the camper was transferred to hospital.

Parks Canada said in a statement that no significant wildlife attractants or food were found inside the tent or the immediate vicinity.

The wolf believed to be involved was found about one kilometre south of the campground, which was closed pending an investigation.

“Incidents like these are very rare,” Parks Canada stated. “Visitor safety is of the utmost importance for Parks Canada . . . Parks Canada continues to monitor wildlife activity in the area and will take further steps if necessary, however this appears to be an isolated incident.”
via Wolf euthanized follow attack at Banff campground | Calgary Herald

Michigan wolf wanders over 2,000 miles in 3 states | Duluth News Tribune

A lone wolf captured and radio-collared in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula last year was struck and killed by a car west of Meadowlands last week, following a journey covering more than 2,000 miles and three states over 14 months.

The male wolf, No. 27121, was trapped and fitted with a GPS transmitting collar near Cup Lake in Gogebic County in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula on May 28, 2018. In June, 2018 it crossed into Wisconsin, where it spent the rest of the year wandering, as far south as Oxford, in south-central Wisconsin near the Wisconsin Dells. It started heading back north this spring and ended up back in its home range in the U.P. by May.

But then it started wandering again, this time west across Wisconsin and crossing into Minnesota just south of Duluth. It kept going west and then north, as far north as Wildwood, east of Northome in Koochiching County, before aiming south. It was struck by a vehicle on Highway 133 about three miles west of Meadowlands and recovered on July 28.
via Michigan wolf wanders over 2,000 miles in 3 states | Duluth News Tribune

The secret summer lives of Voyageurs Park wolves | Duluth News Tribune

Voyageurs Wolf Project researchers Austin Homkes (left) and Tom Gable watch a video of a wolf that triggered the trail camera in the background. The project, a collaboration between the University of Minnesota and Voyageurs National Park, tracks and studies wolves in and near the park during the ice-free months. Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com

ALONG THE MOOSE RIVER — The violence happened in a tall-grass meadow, just off the riverbank, and most anyone else who might wander by here would have missed it entirely.

But dropping down on their knees, Tom Gable and Austin Homkes saw more than just depressions in the grass. They didn’t miss the tiny specs of beaver hair, the wolf scat with more beaver parts, a piece of pelvis bone from a beaver.

“Tom, we’ve got stomach contents here,’’ Homkes hollered. “This is definitely a kill site. There was a struggle and a kill here.”

Gable and Homkes found more evidence of how the beaver, apparently unsuspecting, waddled up from the river onto shore where it appears — and this is pretty much new to science — the wolf was waiting for it.

“It was always assumed that wolves attacked their prey by chasing it down, all of it… But what we are seeing in some of these GPS clusters is that some of these wolves go to places where they expect beaver to show up. And sometimes the beaver shows up,’’ Gable said. “Wolves are waiting out their prey and ambushing it.”
via The secret summer lives of Voyageurs Park wolves | Duluth News Tribune

Seven wolf cubs observed in Beskydy and Javorníky mountains | Radio Prague

 

Scientists have presented new evidence of a thriving wolf population in the Beskydy and Javorníky mountains in north-east of the country. A wolf with seven cubs, which were apparently born this year, was captured on a camera trap. It is the first time wolfs have started reproducing in the area since being re-introduced there in the 1990s.

via Seven wolf cubs observed in Beskydy and Javorníky mountains | Radio Prague