Gros Ventre wolves targeted | Environmental | jhnewsandguide.com

Wyoming wildlife managers aim to kill more wolves in the Gros Ventre area in hopes of drawing some elk back into that river valley during winter.Aerial and ground surveys from the Wyoming Game and Fish Department this year detected just 86 elk on the Gros Ventre’s three feedgrounds and natural winter ranges, which is the lowest number on record.The near-complete absence of elk in the Gros Ventre does not equate to a herd population that’s crashed — it’s where the herd goes in winter that has changed — but some state officials see the situation as a crisis. Game and Fish Deputy Chief of Wildlife Doug Brimeyer, a former Jackson region biologist, told his commissioners earlier this month that the wintertime elk exodus has been “emotional” for managers and others who have watched the changes.

Source: Gros Ventre wolves targeted | Environmental | jhnewsandguide.com

State’s wolf-population growth slows, worrying advocates | The Seattle Times

SPOKANE — Growth in Washington’s gray-wolf population slowed dramatically last year, raising concerns from an environmental group that says the state should stop killing wolves that prey on livestock.At the end of 2017, Washington was home to at least 122 wolves, 22 packs and 14 successful breeding pairs, the state Department of Fish and Wildlife said in a report released last week.

Source: State’s wolf-population growth slows, worrying advocates | The Seattle Times

Red wolves may be going extinct in the wild — again – The Washington Post

This sprawling mix of swamp and forest is the only place in the world where red wolves live in the wild, and on a breezy afternoon Ron Sutherland set out to find one.He drove an SUV slowly on lumpy dirt roads for nearly four hours, scanning spindly trees, murky canals, green thickets and muck. Two other sharp-eyed conservationists helping to search from the back seat also saw nothing.

Source: Red wolves may be going extinct in the wild — again – The Washington Post

Triad filmmaker to show award-winning documentary at High Point Theatre | YES! Weekly

High Point, N.C.– Triad filmmaker, Jeffrey Mittelstadt, will host the North Carolina premiere of his award-winning documentary film, Staring Down Fate, on March 29 at the High Point Theatre. The film follows red wolf biologist Chris Lucash from working here in North Carolina with the only wild red wolf population in the world to his diagnosis with ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis). Staring Down Fate is about searching for purpose in life and in mortality; about finding inspiration in the face of uncertainty.It is a story about 7.4 billion people and our relationship with nature told through one person’s life. Staring Down Fate won “Best Feature Film” across all genres at the Sunrise 45 Film Festival and one of the highest honors at Southern States Indie FanFilmFest, the “Atman Award for Diversity in Film.” Southern City Film Festival also awarded it “Honorable Mention” for Best Feature-Length Documentary.

Source: Triad filmmaker to show award-winning documentary at High Point Theatre | YES! Weekly

How oral vaccines could save Ethiopian wolves from extinction | Science News

Deep in the Bale Mountains of Ethiopia, wildlife workers trek up above 9,800 feet to save some of the world’s most rare carnivores, Ethiopian wolves.“It’s cold, tough work,” says Eric Bedin, who leads the field monitoring team in its uphill battle.In this sparse, sometimes snowy landscape, the lanky and ginger-colored wolves (Canis simensis) reign as the region’s apex predators. Yet the combined threats of rabies, canine distemper and habitat reduction have the animals cornered.

Source: How oral vaccines could save Ethiopian wolves from extinction | Science News

Code Red: The Endangered Red Wolf May Go Extinct In The Wild This Year

IN THE ALLIGATOR RIVER NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, winter is a time of waiting. On the gravel roads that run between the canals and the dense impenetrable forest, biologists wait silently in the cold air for a glimpse of the dusky red canid who calls this small patch of land home. Far away, others are waiting as well—waiting for the release of new U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service management documents that will determine the red wolf’s future. In this placid wilderness—where the only sounds are those of the wind in the trees and the tapping of woodpeckers—it almost feels as though the world is on pause.

Source: Code Red: The Endangered Red Wolf May Go Extinct In The Wild This Year