Iconic Yellowstone Wolf Shot Dead in Legal But ‘Senseless Killing’

A cherished Lamar Valley wolf known as 926F was shot dead after a legal hunt just five miles outside the sanctuary of Yellowstone National Park, prompting calls from advocacy groups for greater protection of the region’s wolves.Tragically, the 7-year-old female was the daughter of Wolf 06—”the most famous wolf in the world”—who was killed the same way back in December 2012.”We are heartbroken to share the news that the wolf killed outside the park was 926F of the Lamar Canyon Pack,” Wolves of the Rockies wrote Wednesday on Facebook.The canine was frequently photographed and highly recognizable for a notch in the right ear and a graying face, according to Yellowstone Wolf: Project Citizen Science.Montana wildlife officials confirmed to the Jackson Hole Daily that the kill on Saturday was state-sanctioned, as it was outside Yellowstone’s boundaries.

Source: Iconic Yellowstone Wolf Shot Dead in Legal But ‘Senseless Killing’

Impact of the Proposed Barrier between Mexico and the United States | American Society of Mammalogists

On the Impact of the Proposed Barrier between Mexico and the United States 22 June 2017 WHEREAS, The American Society of Mammalogists is a non-profit, professional, scientific, and educational society consisting of nearly 3,000 members from all 50 of the United States and 60 other countries worldwide.

Source: Impact of the Proposed Barrier between Mexico and the United States | American Society of Mammalogists

Upper Austrian court cancels decision to get rid of wolves

In one of their most recent press releases, WWF Austria addresses the latest developments in Upper Austria concerning so-called wolf management. Earlier, the Upper Austrian state government decided to allow measures to ‘get rid of’ wolves. Measures should lead to chasing the wolf away, at least.

Source: Upper Austrian court cancels decision to get rid of wolves

Your Children’s Yellowstone Will Be Radically Different – The New York Times

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK — On a recent fall afternoon in the Lamar Valley, visitors watched a wolf pack lope along a thinly forested riverbank, ten or so black and gray figures shadowy against the snow. A little farther along the road, a herd of bison swung their great heads as they rooted for food in the sagebrush steppe, their deep rumbles clear in the quiet, cold air.

3 wolves found caught in traps, DNR investigating 1 shot in head | MLive.com

UPPER PENINSULA – DNR conservation officers and wildlife biologists have responded to recent reports of three wolves accidentally caught in foothold traps. Of those three wolves, two were freed and one was found dead, shot in the head before officers could release it.An investigation into that wolf’s death is ongoing.Details of the trapped wolves were contained in Michigan Department of Natural Resources reports filed by conservation officers in the last month.

Source: 3 wolves found caught in traps, DNR investigating 1 shot in head | MLive.com

Lethal management may hinder population recovery in Iberian wolves | SpringerLinkAbstract:

In previous centuries, wolves were extirpated across much of their range worldwide, but they started to recover in Europe since the end of last century. A general pattern of this recovery is the expansion of the range occupied by local populations. The Iberian wolf population, shared by Portugal and Spain, reached its lowest extent and abundance around the middle of the twentieth century. Unlike other populations in Europe, its range recovery and pack counts seem to have stalled since the first Spanish country-wide census of 1986–1988. The population shows low effective population size and remains isolated from other European wolves. This is unexpected given the protection offered by European legislation, i.e., the Habitats Directive, and the apparent availability of habitat outside its present range. We compiled records of wolves killed legally in Spain, reviewed the legislative and management framework for the Iberian wolf population, and discussed potential implications of a policy of lethal management for the ecology, genetics and conservation status of wolves in the Iberian Peninsula. Wolves are strictly protected in Portugal. Meanwhile, they are subject to culling and hunting in Spain. No wolf was legally removed by culling or hunting during the study period in Portugal, whereas 623 wolves were legally killed in Spain between 2008 and 2013. Twenty-nine of those wolves were killed in areas under strict protection according to European legislation. Despite the transboundary nature of this wolf population, we are not aware of coordinated conservation plans. Management is further fragmented at the sub-national level in Spain, both due to the authority of Spanish autonomous regions over their wildlife, and because wolves were listed in multiple annexes of the Habitats Directive. Fragmentation of management was apparent in the uneven adherence to the obligations of the Habitats Directive among Spanish regions. A similar situation is found for other large predator populations in Europe. We suggest that lethal management as carried out in Spain is a hindrance to transit and settlement of wolves, both within and beyond the Iberian wolf population. Reducing the pressure of lethal management appears a feasible policy change to improve the conservation status of the population and foster transboundary connectivity.

Source: Lethal management may hinder population recovery in Iberian wolves | SpringerLink

The Once Hated Wolf Could Now Save A Struggling Community | HuffPost India

SAN PEDRO DE LAS HERRERIAS, Spain — I meet Javier Talegón and the other wolf enthusiasts at 6:30 a.m. in the blink-and-you-miss-it town on the eastern fringe of the Sierra de la Culebra in the province of Zamora in northwestern Spain. This undulating mountain range, whose name translates as “snake mountains,” slides over the border into neighboring Portugal.Talegón, an expert and guide, is keen to get moving. He bundles us into a couple of waiting cars packed with tripods and telescopic equipment, and we set off for a nearby ridge, where he says we’ll have the best chance of spotting a wolf. Time is of the essence, as the mostly nocturnal wolf we are here to see tends to move only at nightfall and early in the day.

Source: The Once Hated Wolf Could Now Save A Struggling Community | HuffPost India