Scientist at work: Identifying individual gray wolves by their howls

Love them or hate them, wolves are vital members of natural ecosystems and the health of a wolf population can be an important factor in maintaining balance among species. Wolf populations are growing in North America – the Great Lakes region in particular now supports over 3,700 individuals. Keeping track of wolf pack movements is important for reducing human-wolf conflicts which can arise when packs move too close to ranches.The traditional way to track wolves involves setting traps, sedating and then radio-collaring individual animals. While effective, this approach is time intensive and expensive, and entails risks for the animals.I was fortunate to participate in this entire process firsthand as an undergraduate student. During the summer trapping seasons, I became familiar with each of the wolves in the central forest region of Wisconsin. This experience led to several conversations with the wildlife biologists in the area about whether wolf howls could be used to help identifying non-radio-collared pack members.

Source: Scientist at work: Identifying individual gray wolves by their howls

How to achieve a peaceful coexistence between wolves and humans — ScienceDaily

The persecution of wolves in order to remove them from human settlements has culminated in their near-disappearance in numerous European countries, like Spain and Sweden. Following a recovery of the species, a team of scientists has determined what geographic areas in the Scandinavian country would be most suitable for a redistribution of the specie’s range, in the interests of increasing the social acceptance of wolves.

Source: How to achieve a peaceful coexistence between wolves and humans — ScienceDaily

Here’s why there are so many coyotes and why they are spreading so fast – The Washington Post

Coyotes were a purely North American animal that lived in the West. Now they’re everywhere, and state-sponsored hunting that obliterated wolves and mountain lions is a major reason.

Source: Here’s why there are so many coyotes and why they are spreading so fast – The Washington Post

Back on the wolves’ challenge – Tehran Times

No predator has been persecuted more in recent times than the wolves. News Media have frequent titles about the need for more wolf control to protect livestock. But the response to the wolves’ problem has been to eradicate them.Wolves are trapped, poisoned, and shot by herders in Iran. In addition, Department of the Environment (DoE) noted that unintentional robbery of wolves’ cubs has become a great danger especially during spring’s days.What are the consequences of wolves’ eradication?

Source: Back on the wolves’ challenge – Tehran Times