Ranchers, advocates square off on Mexican gray wolf

In November 2011, Mexican officials found the carcass of a Mexican gray wolf near a ranch in Sonora, poisoned and left to die.A few weeks later, in December, officials found three more dead wolves, all poisoned, their skin showing similar lesions. The wolves belonged to the first Mexican gray wolf pack released from captivity onto the Mexican landscape since private and government eradication campaigns nearly drove the species extinct in the middle of the last century.

Source: Ranchers, advocates square off on Mexican gray wolf

Arizona Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project Monthly Update

Arizona – -(Ammoland.com)-The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf. For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit wmatoutdoors.org.

Source: Arizona Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project Monthly Update

Litter of endangered Mexican gray wolf pups born at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo | gazette.com

“Until now, none of the breeding pairs have been successful,” the release says. “Luna’s successful pregnancy is notable because she has very valuable and underrepresented genetics that the SSP was eager to have carried on in the captive population. When they are older, it is possible that Luna’s pups could be released to the wild to help provide genetic diversity in the wild, as well.”The pups’ father is Navarro, who came to Cheyenne Mountain Zoo last November. His genetics also are considered valuable, the release says.”We knew there was possibility that Luna, our 10-year-old female, was pregnant, but it is also fairly common for wolves to experience pseudo pregnancies,” Dina Bredahl, animal care manager for Rocky Mountain Wild, said in the release. “Pseudo pregnancies exhibit the same behavioral and physical changes in the mother, so we were cautiously optimistic that this was an actual pregnancy. The keepers and I are thrilled that she has given us pups!”

Source: Litter of endangered Mexican gray wolf pups born at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo | gazette.com

Endangered Mexican Wolf pups transferred to New Mexico and Arizona | kplr11.com

EUREKA, MO – Once upon a time, well really it’s the first time four endangered Mexican wolf pups born in captivity have been adopted out to two different packs in two different states at the exact same time.“We did the first ever double foster of pups born in a managed care facility at the Endangered Wolf Center in St. Louis,” says Regina Mossotti, Director Animal Care & Conservation Endangered Wolf Center. “We took those puppies all the way to New Mexico and Arizona and put them in two different wild dens, in both of those states.”The chances with wolves of introducing them into the wild, into a den of newborns, and having a new mom take them in as her own?Slim to rare.But that’s exactly what happened.

Source: Endangered Mexican Wolf pups transferred to New Mexico and Arizona | kplr11.com

Mexican Gray Wolves: The Endangered Wolf You’ve Never Heard Of

Once a top dog in the southwestern United States, the Mexican gray wolf is now one of the most endangered subspecies of wolf in the world. In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, thousands of Mexican gray wolves (also known as “el lobo” or “lobos”) prowled around central Mexico, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. In the 1970’s, they found the last 7 Mexican wolves in the world. With stats like these it’s no wonder that the Mexican gray wolf is considered to be one of the most endangered land mammals in the world. But there is hope! Today, their numbers in the wild are coming back in a big way thanks to very concerted conservation efforts.

Source: Mexican Gray Wolves: The Endangered Wolf You’ve Never Heard Of

US, states agree to collaborate on Mexican wolf recovery – seattlepi.com

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) – U.S. government and state officials intend to work together to recover an endangered species of wolves that once roamed the America Southwest, with a new signed agreement.The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish announced the agreement with Arizona and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Thursday. It’s aimed at getting Mexican gray wolves to the point where they can eventually be removed from the endangered species list.As part of the effort, the federal agency plans to work with state wildlife managers to determine the timing, location and the circumstances for releasing wolves into the wild in Arizona and New Mexico.

Source: US, states agree to collaborate on Mexican wolf recovery – seattlepi.com