Border wall poses new problems for the endangered Mexican Gray Wolf | The NM Political Report

A lone male wolf loped across the sandy landscape of the Chihuahuan Desert under a waning January moon in 2017, heading north. The male, known as M1425, was a member of a small population of endangered Mexican gray wolves reintroduced into Mexico in 2012.

The wolf was doing exactly what male wolves should be doing: exploring the landscape in search of new habitat, food sources and possibly even a mate. M1425 spent two nights exploring the new range before turning south and heading back to familiar territory.

The journey north, which took the wolf across the U.S.-Mexico border, was encouraging to researchers who tracked the animal’s peregrinations by GPS collar. Finding suitable mates has become a chief concern in the conservation of Mexican gray wolves, whose recovery has been stymied in part by lack of genetic diversity.
via Border wall poses new problems for the endangered Mexican Gray Wolf | The NM Political Report

Pup fostering gives genetic boost to wild Mexican wolves

ALBUQUERQUE – It’s a carefully planned mission that involves coordination across state lines – from Mexican gray wolf dens hidden deep in the woods of New Mexico and Arizona to breeding facilities at zoos and special conservation centers around the U.S.

It’s also about timing, as wolves in the wild and those in captivity need to be having pups at the same time to ensure a smooth transition.

Pups born within a couple days of each other are the best candidates for a fostering program that aims to get more pups out of captivity and into the wild in hopes of boosting the genetic diversity of the endangered species.
via Pup fostering gives genetic boost to wild Mexican wolves

Sedgwick County Zoo releases endangered wolf pups to the wild | The Wichita Eagle

Sedgwick County Zoo and wildlife experts released two Mexican Wolf pups into the wild as part of an endangered species recovery plan on May 6.

Traveler, a male, and Jaunt, a female, were chosen from Sedgwick County Zoo’s family of six Mexican Wolves to be cross-fostered with a wild pack in Arizona by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said Nancy Smith, senior zoo keeper.

Cross-fostering is a process where pups from one litter are placed with another litter to be raised by the mother wolf as her own to increase population size in the wild and increase genetic diversity. The process must take place within days of both sets of pups being born, according to a news release.

via Sedgwick County Zoo releases endangered wolf pups to the wild | The Wichita Eagle

Survey: More Mexican gray wolves roam Southwest | Livestock | postregister.com

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — More Mexican gray wolves are roaming the American Southwest now than at any time since federal biologists began reintroducing the predators more than two decades ago, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Monday.Agency officials declared progress for the endangered species in New Mexico and Arizona, saying there are at least 131 wolves in the wild in the two states. That represents a 12% jump in the population.Ranchers and others in rural communities within the mountain ranges that border wolf territory have pushed back against the reintroduction program, citing livestock kills and safety concerns.Federal wildlife managers have been working with partners in Arizona, the White Mountain Apache Tribe and the Mexican government to mitigate concerns related to the reintroduction on both sides of the international border, but ranchers in New Mexico and Arizona continue to document conflicts that range from cattle deaths to nuisance reports.

Source: Survey: More Mexican gray wolves roam Southwest | Livestock | postregister.com

Mexican wolves caught in traps in New Mexico highlight ban debate | Grand Canyon News | Grand Canyon, AZ

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The death of a Mexican gray wolf and injuries to another prompted environmentalists Feb. 12 to call on New Mexico lawmakers to ban trapping on public land.Defenders of Wildlife said four wolves have been caught in traps in New Mexico over the last two months. The wolf that died was a female member of the Prieto Pack that roams northern portions of the Gila National Forest. Another member of the pack that was also trapped remains in captivity after having its leg amputated.The two other wolves that were caught were released into the wild.More than 40 wolves have been caught in traps in the Southwest since 2002, according to the group.“This is having a significant impact on the recovery of the species. Every wolf lost to trapping is unnecessary and unacceptable,” said Bryan Bird, the group’s Southwest program director.

Source: Mexican wolves caught in traps in New Mexico highlight ban debate | Grand Canyon News | Grand Canyon, AZ

When wolves fly: Annual Mexican wolf count underway | Apache County | wmicentral.com

ALPINE — For the Mexican wolf Interagency Field Team, midwinter is a busy time. Late January through early February is when the team works to get an accurate count of the number of Mexican gray wolves in eastern Arizona and western New Mexico.While biologists on the team began the work of counting on the ground in November and December, the highlight of annual survey comes when the team uses helicopters and fixed wing aircraft to count the animals, and capture some for collaring.The aerial count was scheduled to begin January 21 and run through February 2, but has was delayed due to the partial government shutdown. Once the government re-opened, the count was started on February 7 and will end on February 23, barring another shutdown.On Tuesday in Alpine, two female wolves were darted by the helicopter crew on two separate flights. The wolves were flown to Alpine to receive a veterinary exam and to be fitted with collars. The wolves are darted with a sedative, Telozol, that allows them to be safely handled and examined.

Source: When wolves fly: Annual Mexican wolf count underway | Apache County | wmicentral.com

Bruselas velará por la “recolonización” del lobo ibérico en Sierra Morena

El lobo ibérico volverá a Sierra Morena. Es, al menos, la intención de la Comisión Europea, que en un reciente escrito remitido a la Consejería de Medio Ambiente y Ordenación del Territorio destaca la “necesidad de continuar trabajando en la recolonización de la especie”. En el texto, al que ha tenido acceso el Día, Bruselas destaca, literalmente, “la necesidad de continuar mejorando las condiciones sociales para aceptar la presencia del lobo, mejorando el conocimiento y promoviendo medidas para consolidar e incrementar su población”. El objetivo es que exista “conectividad con el resto de la población mediterránea”.

Source: Bruselas velará por la “recolonización” del lobo ibérico en Sierra Morena