Mexican gray wolf pup found dead; wildlife officials investigating

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – Wildlife officials are investigating the death of an endangered Mexican gray wolf pup.Federal and state officials involved in the wolf reintroduction program say a female pup belonging to the Diamond Pack that roams southeastern Arizona was found dead in May. The death was noted in a report released this week.

Source: Mexican gray wolf pup found dead; wildlife officials investigating

Wolf pack being monitored has disappeared, reasons still unknown | Kingman Daily Miner | Kingman, AZ

KINGMAN – The Arizona Game and Fish Department was monitoring 58 endangered Mexican wolves wearing radio collars at the end of May, the department reported in its latest update.The overall population of the wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico was 113 at the end of 2016.Annual surveys are conducted by field teams in the winter when the population has the least amount of natural fluctuation. The spring population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups.Wolves with functioning radio collars are listed by studbook number in the pack updates. They’re given an identification number preceded by capital M (male) or F (female) for adult wolves and lowercase letters for wolves younger than 24 months.

Source: Wolf pack being monitored has disappeared, reasons still unknown | Kingman Daily Miner | Kingman, AZ

Press Release | Press Releases | Media | The House Committee on Natural Resources – Democrats

“I’m disappointed that the Trump administration has once again allowed politics to override science. Research shows clearly that areas in southern Utah and Colorado are within the historic range of the Mexican wolf and contain suitable habitat to support its recovery. Today’s action to restrict recovery planning to Arizona, New Mexico and Mexico, combined with Trump’s plan to ignore the Endangered Species Act to build his ill-conceived border wall, virtually ensures the extinction of the Mexican wolf.”

Source: Press Release | Press Releases | Media | The House Committee on Natural Resources – Democrats

Conservationists blast long-awaited recovery plan for Mexican wolves, which excludes Utah, Colorado from lobos’ range | The Salt Lake Tribune

As Utah officials had hoped, a draft federal plan for the recovery of the endangered Mexican gray wolf does not include Utah or Colorado in the area envisioned for the wolf’s range.Released Thursday after decades of delay, the proposal appears to deviate sharply from a draft five years ago, when U.S. Fish and Wildlife scientists considered including southern Utah. The small-bodied wolf species once roamed the American Southwest and northern Mexico.The earlier draft pegged the target for recovery at 750 animals in the United States. The new draft lowers the target to 320 animals sustained over eight years — still triple the current U.S. population — with another 170 in Mexico.

Source: Conservationists blast long-awaited recovery plan for Mexican wolves, which excludes Utah, Colorado from lobos’ range | The Salt Lake Tribune

Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest, a review – Wild Lens

In Executive Producer Alan Lacy’s first film, “Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest” explores the plightof a species the world almost lost forever. Along with Director Dean Cannon and TLP Media, the 50-minute feature tells the story of “El Lobo”, the Mexican gray wolf once exterminated from the wild but, through the efforts of dedicated people, is now making a comeback. This wolf is a subspecies of the northern gray wolf and has historically existed from the northern tip of Arizona to central Mexico. Now, growing in number from a very small foundation and living in the wild, the Mexican gray wolf faces new and old problems as it comes back from the brink of extinction.

Source: Gray Area: Wolves of the Southwest, a review – Wild Lens

Officials confirm deaths of 2 endangered wolf pups | KRQE News 13

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) – Wildlife officials have confirmed that two endangered Mexican gray wolf pups died last month.The Arizona Department of Game and Fish detailed the cases in a monthly report released Thursday.The agency says a female pup with the Hoodoo Pack was found dead in Arizona in March. The cause remains under investigation.A male pup with Arizona’s Bluestem Pack died after being captured for a medical evaluation. Officials say testing confirmed the animal had canine distemper.The most recent survey conducted by federal and state officials involved in the reintroduction program showed at least 113 wolves spread between Arizona and New Mexico. That marked an improvement over the previous year.The survey also showed that 50 wild-born pups survived in 2016 compared with half that the previous year.

Source: Officials confirm deaths of 2 endangered wolf pups | KRQE News 13

Update on Mexican Gray Wolf population – KVOA | KVOA.com | Tucson, Arizona

There’s good news and bad news regarding the Mexican Gray Wolf population. Although numbers are increasing for the endangered species, two young pups died last month, according to a report from the Arizona Department of Game and Fish.The most recent survey, on the reintroduction program, shows at least 113 wolves roaming across Arizona and New Mexico, an improvement from last year.The survey also showed that 50 wild born pups survived in 2016, compared to 25 the previous year.

Source: Update on Mexican Gray Wolf population – KVOA | KVOA.com | Tucson, Arizona