2018 plan for Mexican wolves calls for fostering of pups

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – U.S. wildlife officials have a plan for fostering as many as a dozen captive Mexican gray wolf pups with wild packs in Arizona and New Mexico in 2018.The goal of the proposal unveiled by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is to boost genetic diversity among the endangered species.

Source: 2018 plan for Mexican wolves calls for fostering of pups

The Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Program – Opportunity to Comment on the 2018 Wolf Release Proposal

The US Fish and Wildlife Service is providing the public an opportunity to comment on the document, “Initial Release and Translocation Proposal for 2018.” Responses received will be forwarded to the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish along with our permit application to release wolves onto Gila National Forest Service lands in New Mexico. You may submit written responses by one of the following methods:

Source: The Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Program – Opportunity to Comment on the 2018 Wolf Release Proposal

U.S. adopts plan to restore Mexican gray wolf population in the Southwest – Portland Press Herald

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — After decades of legal challenges and political battles that have pitted states against the federal government, U.S. wildlife managers on Wednesday finally adopted a plan to guide the recovery of a wolf that once roamed parts of the American Southwest and northern Mexico.The plan sets a goal of having an average of 320 Mexican gray wolves in the wild over an eight-year period before the predator can shed its status as an endangered species. In each of the last three years, the population would have to exceed the average to ensure that numbers don’t regress.

Source: U.S. adopts plan to restore Mexican gray wolf population in the Southwest – Portland Press Herald

Fish and Wildlife unveils Mexican gray wolf recovery plan | Albuquerque Journal

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released its long-awaited Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan on Wednesday, the first update since 1982, and environmental groups say it doesn’t go far enough to protect the endangered subspecies.A draft of it released in July received more than 100,000 public comments, said Sherry Barrett, the Mexican gray wolf recovery coordinator with Fish and Wildlife. It also underwent multiple peer reviews.

Source: Fish and Wildlife unveils Mexican gray wolf recovery plan | Albuquerque Journal

Mexican Gray Wolf Lethally Removed from the Wild

ANTA FE (Sept. 15, 2017) – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced today that for the first time in over a decade, a Mexican gray wolf, or lobo, was lethally removed in Arizona due to conflicts with livestock.Bryan Bird, Southwest program director for Defenders of Wildlife, issued the following statement:“We strongly condemn the killing of this Mexican gray wolf. The lobo is the world’s most endangered subspecies of gray wolf, and there are too few in the wild for any to be removed. News of this wolf’s killing is particularly devastating since it has been over a decade since the last lobo was lethally removed from the wild for conflicts with livestock.

Source: Mexican Gray Wolf Lethally Removed from the Wild

Thousands weigh in on wolf recovery plan | Local News | santafenewmexican.com

Just hours before the Tuesday night deadline approached for the public to weigh in on a proposed federal management plan for the endangered Mexican gray wolf, more than 9,000 comments had been posted online. Thousands more had been submitted to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service by mail — most opposing a wolf recovery plan that many criticized as too restrictive to allow the species to thrive.Last week, the New Mexico State Game Commission voted to support the proposal, one that conservationists have argued will cede too much control to the states of New Mexico and Arizona. Both states have sought to limit the recovery program, and New Mexico officials have taken legal action in recent years seeking to block wolf releases.The Fish and Wildlife Service is under a court order to have a completed wolf management plan by the end of November.

Source: Thousands weigh in on wolf recovery plan | Local News | santafenewmexican.com

Business leaders urge Mexican wolf restoration in Grand Canyon area

Over 60 business leaders have urged the federal government to release endangered Mexican gray wolves into the Grand Canyon region, expanding the predator’s habitat beyond eastern Arizona.The group submitted a letter to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service criticizing the agency’s long-awaited recovery plan released in June because it confined the recovery zone south of Interstate 40.

Source: Business leaders urge Mexican wolf restoration in Grand Canyon area