WDFW to limit GPS data revealing whereabouts of wolves – Livestock – Capital Press

Washington wildlife managers will be less precise about the whereabouts of wolves, holding back information previously shared with ranchers, range-riders and local authorities, according to a policy outlined by the Department of Fish and Wildlife this week.Fish and Wildlife says exact locations, dra

Source: WDFW to limit GPS data revealing whereabouts of wolves – Livestock – Capital Press

Wolves in Oregon: The inside story; Return of wolves likely to spread to central Cascades, experts say

BAKER CITY — Southwest of the heart of Oregon’s nascent wolf population — miles from the dead calves, the helicopter chases, the decade-plus of vitriolic local politics swirling around wolves — is a small creek that illustrates why they’re worth the trouble.That’s where you’ll find Suzanne Fouty, waist-deep in a no-name tributary of the Burnt River lined with beaver dams, deep in the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest about four hours northeast of Bend.Wolves living in the Wallowa Mountains haven’t discovered this part of the forest — at least not yet. But Fouty, a retired hydrologist formerly with the U.S. Forest Service, said a busy dirt road nearby simulates the impact wolves may one day have on the landscape, scaring deer and elk away from the creek.

Source: Wolves in Oregon: The inside story; Return of wolves likely to spread to central Cascades, experts say

Wolves return to Profanity Peak pack area | The Spokesman-Review

Wolf pack activity has been documented by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife officials in the former Profanity Peak pack area.Seven members of the Profanity Peak pack were removed in 2016 by WDFW officials. WDFW officials are working with ranchers to develop non-lethal deterrence methods in advance of the grazing season. The Profanity Peak pack was located in Ferry County.

Source: Wolves return to Profanity Peak pack area | The Spokesman-Review

Wolves Are Losing Ground to Industrial Logging in Southeast Alaska | Latest News | Earth Island Journal | Earth Island Institute

For 12,000 years, wolves have roamed Southeast Alaska’s rugged Alexander Archipelago — a 300-mile stretch of more than 1,000 islands mostly within the Tongass National Forest. Now, their old-growth forest habitat is rapidly disappearing, putting the wolves at risk. As the region’s logging policies garner controversy, a new study examines what the wolves need in order to survive.

Source: Wolves Are Losing Ground to Industrial Logging in Southeast Alaska | Latest News | Earth Island Journal | Earth Island Institute

Collaborative effort: A Washington cattleman and biologist are working to reduce wolf-livestock conflicts | The Spokesman-Review

A fifth-generation cattleman and a wildlife biologist are teaming to help northeastern Washington ranchers coexist with the state’s growing number of gray wolves.Stemming from their boots-on-the ground experience with wolf-livestock conflicts, Arron Scotten and Jay Shepherd have formed the nonprofit Northeast Washington Wolf-Cattle Collaborative.They plan to use funding from state and other sources to provide more nonlethal wolf attack deterrents in the region where 16 of the state’s 22 identified packs reside.Both men have roots in the agricultural community and have worked with existing state and private programs related to wolf conflicts.

Source: Collaborative effort: A Washington cattleman and biologist are working to reduce wolf-livestock conflicts | The Spokesman-Review

Oregon officials kill 2 wolves in effort to save cattle | The Bellingham Herald

SALEM, Ore.Oregon wildlife officials shot and killed two wolves from a helicopter Wednesday in an attempt to reduce killings of cattle by the predators.The killings have reignited a debate between the state, ranchers and environmentalists about how to manage wolves, which were hunted down for 100 years until they disappeared in 1947.Another young female wolf was shot and killed by a state wildlife official on April 10 on private land where previous depredations occurred. All three wolves belong to the Pine Creek Pack, which roams in eastern Oregon’s Baker County, and has killed four calves and injured six others in recent days, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said.

Source: Oregon officials kill 2 wolves in effort to save cattle | The Bellingham Herald

State’s wolf-population growth slows, worrying advocates | The Seattle Times

SPOKANE — Growth in Washington’s gray-wolf population slowed dramatically last year, raising concerns from an environmental group that says the state should stop killing wolves that prey on livestock.At the end of 2017, Washington was home to at least 122 wolves, 22 packs and 14 successful breeding pairs, the state Department of Fish and Wildlife said in a report released last week.

Source: State’s wolf-population growth slows, worrying advocates | The Seattle Times