Brown defies feds on gray wolf;

Slapping down a stance taken by the director of Oregon’s wildlife department, Gov. Kate Brown declared May 15 that the state and its agencies oppose the federal government’s proposal to take the gray wolf off the endangered species list.Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Director Curtis Melcher had written May 9 to a federal agency in support of the proposal, saying that in the Lower 48 states and Mexico, the gray wolf no longer meets the definition of an endangered or threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act.

Source: Brown defies feds on gray wolf;

Rift in Oregon’s stance on gray wolves;

SALEM — Slapping down a stance taken by the director of Oregon’s wildlife department, Gov. Kate Brown declared Wednesday that the state and its agencies oppose the federal government’s proposal to take the gray wolf off the endangered species list.Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Director Curtis Melcher had written May 9 to a federal agency in support of the proposal, saying that in the Lower 48 states and Mexico, the gray wolf no longer meets the definition of an endangered or threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act.Conservation groups and an Oregon congressman blasted Melcher’s position after the letter, which had not been publicly announced, came to light this week. Then Brown herself weighed in Wednesday in a letter to U.S. Interior Secretary David Bernhardt, saying she wanted to “clarify and ­correct” Melcher.

Source: Rift in Oregon’s stance on gray wolves;

Wolf update includes new pack in Walla Walla area | Walla Walla County | union-bulletin.com

During an hourlong talk, Steve Pozzanghera, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Region 1 director, briefed commissioners on the latest status of the gray wolf population and what’s on the horizon for the growing population in the state and locally, where a new pack has been identified.At the start of his presentation, Pozzanghera said he has been spending a lot of time in Northeast Washington talking with county commissioners about gray wolves “and as we see additional packs now starting to reside in the Blue Mountains … I think these dialogues are going to become more common.”

Source: Wolf update includes new pack in Walla Walla area | Walla Walla County | union-bulletin.com

Rep. Earl Blumenauer to Attend Portland Rally Against Removal of Gray Wolf From Endangered Species List – Willamette Week

On March 6, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, under newly appointed Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt, announced plans to remove the gray wolf from the Endangered Species list.Now wildlife conservationists in Portland are protesting, saying the move would allow for trophy hunting and trapping of the animals. At last count, there were 137 known gray wolves in Oregon.

Source: Rep. Earl Blumenauer to Attend Portland Rally Against Removal of Gray Wolf From Endangered Species List – Willamette Week

Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives | UW News

As gray wolves continue to make a strong comeback in Washington state, their presence can’t help but impact other animals — particularly the ones these large carnivores target as prey.White-tailed deer and mule deer, two distinct species common in Washington, are among wolves’ favorite catch. Wolves will chase deer great distances — sometimes upwards of 6 miles (10 kilometers) — in search of a satisfying meal. How these two deer species respond to the threat of being pursued by wolves in the early years of this predator’s return could shed light on changes to their behavior and numbers.

Source: Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives | UW News

Gray wolf OR-54’s return to Nevada County part of ‘dispersal’ activity | TheUnion.com

Nevada County certainly has its fair share of wildlife, from the more commonly spotted deer and turkeys to the more elusive foxes, coyotes, mountain lions, bears and ring-tailed cats.But the news that a gray wolf known as OR-54 — deemed “a traveling maniac” by one wolf expert — was tracked to Nevada County this January drew widespread interest. The nearly 3-year-old female wolf, born into Oregon’s Rogue Pack, was making her second visit since an initial foray in June of last year.

Source: Gray wolf OR-54’s return to Nevada County part of ‘dispersal’ activity | TheUnion.com