News Releases – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

PORTLAND, Ore. — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is offering a $5,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of the person(s) responsible for killing a federally protected gray wolf in south-central Oregon.On April 23, 2017, a canid carcass was found about 20 miles northwest of Klamath Falls on Fremont-Winema National Forest. The carcass was sent to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s Forensics Labs in Ashland, Oregon, for a necropsy, which determined that it was a male gray wolf known as OR-33, and that it died from gunshot wounds. The Service does not have an estimated date of when it was shot.OR-33 dispersed from the Imnaha Pack in northeastern Oregon in November 2015, and was not known to be part of any pack. The approximately 4-year-old wolf had a collar, but it quit transmitting in August 2016.It is a violation of the Endangered Species Act to kill a gray wolf, which is listed as endangered in the western two-thirds of Oregon. It is also a violation of Oregon state game laws. The Oregon State Police and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are investigating the incident.Anyone with information about this case should call the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at (503) 682-6131, or Oregon State Police Tip Line at (800) 452-7888. Callers may remain anonymous.

Source: News Releases – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Working with wolves: Local rancher tries new approach

An ongoing effort to reduce risks to livestock in wolf ranges has produced a new strategy being promoted by one Siskiyou County rancher whose livestock roams in the range of the first recorded wolfpack in California in decades.An ongoing effort to reduce risks to livestock in wolf ranges has produced a new strategy being promoted by one Siskiyou County rancher whose livestock roams in the range of the first recorded wolfpack in California in decades.Butte Valley rancher Mark Coats has been involved in efforts to address wolf-livestock issues since OR-7 – the first wolf documented as having entered state in nearly a century – entered California in 2011.

Source: Working with wolves: Local rancher tries new approach

State Ends Wolf Killing After 2 Months Without Cattle Attack | Washington News | US News

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — The state Department of Fish and Wildlife says efforts to kill members of a wolf pack north of Spokane have ended.The agency said Tuesday that wolves from the Smackout pack have shown no signs of preying on livestock in Stevens County since July when state wildlife managers trapped and killed two of its members.Agency wolf manager Donny Martorello says the wolves killed were a 30-pound female and a 70-pound female.Martorello says officials took that action after documenting four instances of predation on livestock over 10 months. He says under their wolf-removal protocol, the pattern of predation on calves belonging to three ranchers met the threshold for lethal removal.

Source: State Ends Wolf Killing After 2 Months Without Cattle Attack | Washington News | US News

Oregon will kill 2 wolves in Wallowa County – News – MailTribune.com – Medford, OR

Oregon wildlife officials will kill two adult wolves in Wallowa County this month at the request of ranchers who say the animals or their pack mates have preyed on cattle on public and private lands for more than a year.The state announced plans for the killings Thursday afternoon. Department of Fish & Wildlife managers said the state will not target specific animals. Instead, officials will remove two adult uncollared animals in the Harl Butte pack sometimes in the next two weeks.

Source: Oregon will kill 2 wolves in Wallowa County – News – MailTribune.com – Medford, OR

As State Kills Wolves Calls for Transparency on Ore Wolf Plan / Public News Service

PORTLAND, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has killed four members of the Harl Butte wolf pack and authorized killing two more from the Meacham pack after livestock deaths in northeast Oregon.The decision has made calls from conservation groups even more urgent to revise the state’s Wolf Conservation and Management Plan. The plan is slated for update every five years and was supposed to be revised in 2015. Groups are concerned the new plan in the works weakens protections and even could open the door to trophy hunting, said Aaron Tam, Pacific Northwest organizer for the Endangered Species Coalition.”The lack of transparency in the current wolf plan creates confusion and conflict among stakeholders,” he said. “The governor needs to weigh in on this. Scientists don’t agree with the current revisions to the wolf plan.”

Source: As State Kills Wolves Calls for Transparency on Ore Wolf Plan / Public News Service