Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives | UW News

As gray wolves continue to make a strong comeback in Washington state, their presence can’t help but impact other animals — particularly the ones these large carnivores target as prey.White-tailed deer and mule deer, two distinct species common in Washington, are among wolves’ favorite catch. Wolves will chase deer great distances — sometimes upwards of 6 miles (10 kilometers) — in search of a satisfying meal. How these two deer species respond to the threat of being pursued by wolves in the early years of this predator’s return could shed light on changes to their behavior and numbers.

Source: Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives | UW News

Gray wolf OR-54’s return to Nevada County part of ‘dispersal’ activity | TheUnion.com

Nevada County certainly has its fair share of wildlife, from the more commonly spotted deer and turkeys to the more elusive foxes, coyotes, mountain lions, bears and ring-tailed cats.But the news that a gray wolf known as OR-54 — deemed “a traveling maniac” by one wolf expert — was tracked to Nevada County this January drew widespread interest. The nearly 3-year-old female wolf, born into Oregon’s Rogue Pack, was making her second visit since an initial foray in June of last year.

Source: Gray wolf OR-54’s return to Nevada County part of ‘dispersal’ activity | TheUnion.com

California’s Gray Wolves Still Protected, Court Rules | Time

(LOS ANGELES) — A California judge on Monday upheld protection for gray wolves under the state’s Endangered Species Act, rejecting a legal challenge from ranchers and farmers who fear the predators will threaten their livestock.The judge in San Diego ruled that California was right to list the wolves as endangered in 2014. A lawsuit on behalf of the California Farm Bureau Federation and the California Cattlemen’s Association argued the listing was arbitrary because there are so few wolves in the state.

Source: California’s Gray Wolves Still Protected, Court Rules | Time

Is there a lone wolf in the Yakima Valley? Researcher wants to know | Local | yakimaherald.com

YAKIMA, Wash. — The search for wolves in Washington now extends into the south Cascades and Yakima County.Washington Department of Fish and 
 Wildlife officials haven’t yet
 confirmed a sighting in this region,
 but statewide wolf specialist Ben
 Maletzke believes it could 
 happen soon. He’s eager
 to investigate citizen
 reports of lone wolves
 in the Cowiche area as
 well as the Nile Basin 
 north of Yakima, and 
 he encouraged others 
 to share any evidence
 they might find.
 Those efforts from
 staff and the general
 public play a key
 role in gathering information for the agency’s
 annual report, which
 attempts to track wolf behavior and provide population estimates that guide policy decisions. Work began in earnest at the start of 2019, and Maletzke said results should be finalized by the end of March.

Source: Is there a lone wolf in the Yakima Valley? Researcher wants to know | Local | yakimaherald.com

Wolves making faster comeback than expected in Washington state | king5.com

here are more wolves in Washington state than officials originally estimated. A lot more.In the most recent estimate from 2018, officials counted 24 packs. The state reports a growth rate of 30 percent per year. Sometimes it’s less; last year’s growth rate was just six percent.Wolf researchers and policy leads presented the findings to the state Senate Agriculture, Water, Natural Resources and Parks Committee on Tuesday.

Source: Wolves making faster comeback than expected in Washington state | king5.com

Wildlife Commission to Finally Vote on Oregon Wolf Plan | Oregon News | US News

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon Fish and Wildlife commission is finally set to vote on a plan for managing wolves in the state, after years of contentious meetings.The commission is expected to vote in March, The Oregonian/OregonLive reported .As in other northwestern states, wolves have been controversial in Oregon, with ranchers saying they wreak havoc on livestock and conservationists saying they play a key role in the ecosystem.The main sticking point has been over when and how lethal action can be taken against wolves that kill livestock.The first wolf management plan was implemented in 2005 and revised in 2010, just a year after wolves made their return to Oregon after dispersing from packs in Idaho. The plan was supposed to be updated every five years, but the 2015 revisions became mired in argument and repeated delays ensued.

Source: Wildlife Commission to Finally Vote on Oregon Wolf Plan | Oregon News | US News

Rancher under siege from wolves suggests fence | KTVL

A Prospect rancher under siege from wolf attacks said he’s frustrated and wonders how the state will revise Oregon’s Wolf Conservation and Management Plan effectively. Oregon Department of Forestry and Wildlife announced Thursday the revised plan will be presented to the commission at its March 15 meeting in Salem for final adoption despite setbacks. “I’ve lost five calves and one guard dog. Those are confirmed wolf kills,” Ted Birdseye said. “They’ll be back it’s just a matter of time. ”

Source: Rancher under siege from wolves suggests fence | KTVL