Wolf that attacked dog euthanized in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve | CTV Vancouver Island News

Officials at Pacific Rim National Park Reserve have killed a wolf they say was responsible for two attacks on leashed dogs, including one over the weekend.Parks Canada staff say the wolf was involved in multiple incidents in the Long Beach area of the reserve, and the most recent attack occurred Sunday morning.It happened on a trail just below Green Point Campground, said Renee Wissink, manager of resource conservation for the park.“Very bold behaviour, very close to people,” said Wissink. “While the attack was still focused on the dog, the proximity to people was just way too close and we can’t jeopardize visitor safety.”

Source: Wolf that attacked dog euthanized in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve | CTV Vancouver Island News

Patricia Randolph’s Madravenspeak: Despite extinction crisis, hunters push to kill wolves and sandhill cranes | Wisconsin Wildlife Ethic-Vote Our Wildlife

As humanity hurtles toward catastrophe, our legislators turn a blind eye to reality and continue to pander to forces of destruction and death. Instead of caring for the fragile life of this earth, legislators like state Sen. Tom Tiffany and U.S. Sens. Tammy Baldwin and Ron Johnson continue to ignore the science of the Endangered Species Act, pushing to kill our endangered wolves.And the hunters want to kill cranes. They apparently are bored with killing other wildlife. Maybe they want a wolf with a crane in his mouth to hang on their walls.It is not that difficult to connect the dots between the status quo and certain trajectory toward an unlivable and desolate home planet. The skies are emptying, as are woods and oceans — not through any natural force, but only by the violence of man. Chris Hedges writes in his recent “Reign of Idiots”: “Europeans and Americans have spent five centuries conquering, plundering, exploiting and polluting the earth in the name of human progress. … They believed that this orgy of blood and gold would never end, and they still believe it.”

Source: Patricia Randolph’s Madravenspeak: Despite extinction crisis, hunters push to kill wolves and sandhill cranes | Wisconsin Wildlife Ethic-Vote Our Wildlife

OR-7 is alive, well and still bringing home the groceries – Oregon – Capital Press

His tracking collar went dead in 2015, but OR-7, the wandering wolf, is alive and well. This spring, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trail camera caught him trotting along with what a wildlife biologist said is an elk leg in his mouth.Federal wildlife biologist John Stephenson said OR-7 was taking

Source: OR-7 is alive, well and still bringing home the groceries – Oregon – Capital Press

Study: To Mitigate Problem Predators, Give Wolves More Space, Tolerance | NW News Network

Wolves mostly make the news when they are in conflict with livestock and that’s part of the reason they were once removed from the Western landscape. But a new study shows wolves play an important role, whether we like it or not.
It’s not just wolves that prey on livestock.“Worldwide, smaller meso-predators like coyotes, jackals and such, actually themselves prey pretty heavily on livestock and can cause a lot of economic damage,” Aaron Wirsing of the University of Washington said.Wirsing co-authored a new study in the journal Nature Communications. He said current land management policies don’t offer apex predators enough space, but that doesn’t mean he wants to see wolves roaming rampant across North America. 

“We need to allow predators to occupy more landscapes than just remote, protected areas,” Wirsing said. “On the other hand, we also need to heavily manage them, recognizing that they do conflict with people.”

Source: Study: To Mitigate Problem Predators, Give Wolves More Space, Tolerance | NW News Network

Kootenay conservation officers believe someone intentionally poisoning wolves – British Columbia – CBC News

Conservation officers in B.C.’s East Kootenay are investigating after the discovery of two wolves they believe were intentionally poisoned.Conservation officer Greg Kruger said poison was first discovered in early March in the Dutch Creek region, west of Canal Flats — an area known for its active wolf population.”Where all these … poison containers have been found are all areas that we know are wolf travel corridors,” Kruger said. “So our investigation is looking at someone specifically targeting the wolf population.”

Source: Kootenay conservation officers believe someone intentionally poisoning wolves – British Columbia – CBC News

Pining for better days in the fjords: Norway’s wolves are being hunted; its reindeer are going mad | The Economist

“SJALDAN liggjandi ulfr laer um getr,” goes a passage in the Havamal, a medieval Norse poem: “The sleeping wolf seldom gets a ham.” The maxim, like the one about early birds and worms, is an exhortation against laziness, but it also conjures a vision of Norway as a land of untamed nature, where wolves chase boars through snow-bound forests. This may have been true in the 10th century, but today the country’s wild fauna are not doing as well. Wolves are rare, and the government is under pressure to cull them further. Another iconic species faces a different threat: chronic wasting disease (CWD), a sort of mad cow disease that can infect reindeer.

Source: Pining for better days in the fjords: Norway’s wolves are being hunted; its reindeer are going mad | The Economist

Spot a Yellowstone wolf? You now can find its family tree and genealogy online | Outdoors | missoulian.com

BILLINGS — Her parents may have been killed by her mate and his family. Her daughter was shot. Now she’s dead and her killing is under investigation.Although the details may sound like the story line for a soap opera, a Shakespearean play or even the historical dirty deeds of Europe’s competing monarchies, it’s actually the tale of one of Yellowstone National Park’s well-known wolves — the white alpha female of the Canyon pack. Now, details of the park’s individual wolves and their inter-relatedness can be found in one place: online at Ancestry.com, a website formerly reserved for rooting out human family trees.“People love their wolves,” said Jim Halfpenny, the founder of the Yellowstone Wolf Genealogy Family Tree.

Source: Spot a Yellowstone wolf? You now can find its family tree and genealogy online | Outdoors | missoulian.com