El Consejo de Caza aprueba el Plan de gestión del lobo, que podría entrar en vigor en marzo | El Diario Montañes

El Consejo Regional de Caza ha aprobado el plan de gestión del lobo, en el que se elimina la consideración del lobo en relación con actividades turísticas o recreativas, y que el Gobierno espera que pueda entrar en vigor en marzo.El Consejo Regional de Caza ha estado presidido por el consejero de Medio Rural, Jesús Oria, y ha contado con la participación de representantes de asociaciones de caza, conservacionistas y de ayuntamientos.

Source: El Consejo de Caza aprueba el Plan de gestión del lobo, que podría entrar en vigor en marzo | El Diario Montañes

Female wolf settles in the Netherlands and may have a mate – DutchNews.nl

A female wolf which has been roaming the northern part of the Veluwe national park in Gelderland can now be considered to be the first wolf to be officially settled there and off-spring may be on the way, wolf monitoring organisation Wolven in Nederland claims.A wolf is considered settled when it stays in a certain area for longer than six months. DNA in the wolf droppings, show that this is the case for Veluwe wolf GW998F, the organisation said, while droppings from a male wolf and tracks in the snow from both animals suggest that the female has found a mate.

Source: Female wolf settles in the Netherlands and may have a mate – DutchNews.nl

Mexican wolves caught in traps in New Mexico highlight ban debate | Grand Canyon News | Grand Canyon, AZ

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The death of a Mexican gray wolf and injuries to another prompted environmentalists Feb. 12 to call on New Mexico lawmakers to ban trapping on public land.Defenders of Wildlife said four wolves have been caught in traps in New Mexico over the last two months. The wolf that died was a female member of the Prieto Pack that roams northern portions of the Gila National Forest. Another member of the pack that was also trapped remains in captivity after having its leg amputated.The two other wolves that were caught were released into the wild.More than 40 wolves have been caught in traps in the Southwest since 2002, according to the group.“This is having a significant impact on the recovery of the species. Every wolf lost to trapping is unnecessary and unacceptable,” said Bryan Bird, the group’s Southwest program director.

Source: Mexican wolves caught in traps in New Mexico highlight ban debate | Grand Canyon News | Grand Canyon, AZ

St. Vincent Wildlife Refuge recovering after Hurricane Michael, government shutdown | News | wtxl.com

ST. VINCENT ISLAND (WTXL) – A second government shutdown has been avoided, but the five week shutdown earlier this year is having a lasting impact on a National Wildlife Refuge in our area. Just off the coast of Gulf and Franklin Counties, St. Vincent Island is home to endangered species and a host of other wildlife.But during the longest government shutdown ever, the island was left unattended for weeks. “The staff was not able to be here. We lost 600 hours of their time working on the refugee managing wildlife,” said Susan Cerulean, Incoming President of Friends of St. Vincent NWR. One of the animals most affected by the shutdown was the endangered red wolf.There are only about 200 red wolves in the U.S with four of them living on St. Vincent. Volunteer Nancy Stewart says staff members try to tag baby red wolves during January because when wolves get scared, their body temperatures rise.

Source: St. Vincent Wildlife Refuge recovering after Hurricane Michael, government shutdown | News | wtxl.com

Germany’s wolves are on the rise thanks to a surprising ally: the military | Science | AAAS

Wolves are an impressive success story for wildlife recovery in central Europe, bouncing back from near extermination in the 20th century to a population of several thousand today. And in Germany, where populations have been growing by 36% per year, military bases have played a surprisingly central role in helping the animals reclaim habitat, a new analysis finds.

Source: Germany’s wolves are on the rise thanks to a surprising ally: the military | Science | AAAS

When wolves fly: Annual Mexican wolf count underway | Apache County | wmicentral.com

ALPINE — For the Mexican wolf Interagency Field Team, midwinter is a busy time. Late January through early February is when the team works to get an accurate count of the number of Mexican gray wolves in eastern Arizona and western New Mexico.While biologists on the team began the work of counting on the ground in November and December, the highlight of annual survey comes when the team uses helicopters and fixed wing aircraft to count the animals, and capture some for collaring.The aerial count was scheduled to begin January 21 and run through February 2, but has was delayed due to the partial government shutdown. Once the government re-opened, the count was started on February 7 and will end on February 23, barring another shutdown.On Tuesday in Alpine, two female wolves were darted by the helicopter crew on two separate flights. The wolves were flown to Alpine to receive a veterinary exam and to be fitted with collars. The wolves are darted with a sedative, Telozol, that allows them to be safely handled and examined.

Source: When wolves fly: Annual Mexican wolf count underway | Apache County | wmicentral.com

Wolf caught in Bengal’s Jhargram

Residents of villages near Jhargram caught an Indian Wolf on Thursday morning after the animal had attacked four men and as many women.The animal was taken to Jhargram Zoo Hospital to ascertain whether any injury has made it aggressive.The injured have been admitted to Jhargram District Hospital. They are from Shimuldanga, Ghritakham, Jarulia and Kundaldihi villages, all of which are located in dense forests.A 30-year-old man from Jamboni, Lalmohan Soren, died two months ago after a wolf mauled his neck. It could not be verified whether the animal that was caught on Thursday was the one that had killed Lalmohan.“Indian Wolves are at times spotted in Jhargram forests. It appears the adult male that was caught today entered the villages in search of food. Local people caught the animal after it attacked a goat at Kendashole village,” an official in the forest department said. “The wolf was not part of the pack that was roaming the area.”

Source: Wolf caught in Bengal’s Jhargram