Baffin Island Wolf

Facts about Baffin Island Wolfs. “Scientific name for Baffin Island Wolf is Canis lupus manningi”. The Baffin Island Wolf is a sub variety of Gray Wolf that belongs to the genus Canis of the Canidae family. The Baffin Island Wolf can be commonly called the Baffin Island Tundra wolf and they mostly survive on the Baffin Island and on a number of nearby islands. Until 1943, the Baffin Island wolf breed was not officially acknowledged as a sub variety, where it was given its taxonomic categorization by the State of Anderson. Early reports and proofs suggest that the Baffin Island Wolves migrated in western Greenland from Baffin Island, and hence, they are the successors of the subspecies of the Baffin Island Wolf. The Baffin Island Wolf is categorized as an endangered animal, owing to home obliteration, like the rainforest, introduction of disease, exotic species, water contamination, global warming and excessive use of natural resources.

Source: Baffin Island Wolf – Knowledge Base LookSeek.com

An alternative to wolf control to save endangered caribou: Researchers study the effectiveness of a new government strategy to stabilize the caribou population by focusing on the reduction of invasive moose populations, indirectly lowering the density of the caribou’s primary predator — ScienceDaily

Apparent competition is an increasing problem, causing endangerment and extinction of native prey as abundant species colonize new areas in the wake of human-caused change to the environment. This is exactly what is happening to the iconic woodland caribou across North America. Prey like moose and white-tailed deer are expanding in numbers and range because of logging and climate change, which in turn increases predator numbers (e.g. wolves). With all these additional predators on the landscape, more caribou become by-catch, driving some herds to extinction.A short-term solution would be to kill wolves but this can be seen as just a band aid, and is no longer politically acceptable in many jurisdictions. As a more ultimate solution, Serrouya and colleagues used a new government policy and treated it as an experiment, to maximize learning. The new policy was to reduce moose numbers to levels that existed prior to widescale logging, with an adjacent reference area where moose were not reduced. The results of this research are published in an article titled “Experimental moose reduction lowers wolf density and stops decline of endangered caribou,” and is published today in the peer reviewed and open access journal PeerJ.

Source: An alternative to wolf control to save endangered caribou: Researchers study the effectiveness of a new government strategy to stabilize the caribou population by focusing on the reduction of invasive moose populations, indirectly lowering the density of the caribou’s primary predator — ScienceDaily

Ottawa biologist meets wolf — at 1 a.m. in his tent | Ottawa Citizen

Ottawa’s Paul Sokoloff was doing a peaceful survey of plants in the High Arctic when a wolf stuck its head into his tent.So Sokoloff did the only thing that made sense. He grabbed his camera.Sokoloff is a plant biologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature and has just returned from a three-week expedition charting the plants of several Arctic sites. He was at Lake Hazen on Ellesmere Island when he woke up in the bright Arctic night and saw an Arctic wolf poking its head through his tent door.“Just its face (came in), thank God,” he said.“I took a picture because that’s the first thing you think of when a wolf comes into your tent. I started yelling at it. It’s 1:30 in the morning, so I’m waking up the rest of the camp.“Troy (another biologist) hears this and he starts yelling at the wolf. And the wolf, instead of getting spooked, says, ‘Oh there are people over here too,’ and went over to Troy’s tent and proceeded to be curious.

Source: Ottawa biologist meets wolf — at 1 a.m. in his tent | Ottawa Citizen

Meet Rare Sea Wolves Who Live Off The Ocean And Can Swim For Hours | Bored Panda

Along the wild Pacific coast of British Columbia, there lives a population of the sea wolves. “We know from exhaustive DNA studies that these wolves are genetically distinct from their continental kin,” says McAllister. “They are behaviourally distinct, swimming from island to island and preying on sea animals. They are also morphologically distinct — they are smaller in size and physically different from their mainland counterparts,” says Ian McAllister, an award-winning photographer who has been studying these animals for almost two decades.

Source: Meet Rare Sea Wolves Who Live Off The Ocean And Can Swim For Hours | Bored Panda

Wolf that attacked dog euthanized in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve | CTV Vancouver Island News

Officials at Pacific Rim National Park Reserve have killed a wolf they say was responsible for two attacks on leashed dogs, including one over the weekend.Parks Canada staff say the wolf was involved in multiple incidents in the Long Beach area of the reserve, and the most recent attack occurred Sunday morning.It happened on a trail just below Green Point Campground, said Renee Wissink, manager of resource conservation for the park.“Very bold behaviour, very close to people,” said Wissink. “While the attack was still focused on the dog, the proximity to people was just way too close and we can’t jeopardize visitor safety.”

Source: Wolf that attacked dog euthanized in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve | CTV Vancouver Island News