Ottawa biologist meets wolf — at 1 a.m. in his tent | Ottawa Citizen

Ottawa’s Paul Sokoloff was doing a peaceful survey of plants in the High Arctic when a wolf stuck its head into his tent.So Sokoloff did the only thing that made sense. He grabbed his camera.Sokoloff is a plant biologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature and has just returned from a three-week expedition charting the plants of several Arctic sites. He was at Lake Hazen on Ellesmere Island when he woke up in the bright Arctic night and saw an Arctic wolf poking its head through his tent door.“Just its face (came in), thank God,” he said.“I took a picture because that’s the first thing you think of when a wolf comes into your tent. I started yelling at it. It’s 1:30 in the morning, so I’m waking up the rest of the camp.“Troy (another biologist) hears this and he starts yelling at the wolf. And the wolf, instead of getting spooked, says, ‘Oh there are people over here too,’ and went over to Troy’s tent and proceeded to be curious.

Source: Ottawa biologist meets wolf — at 1 a.m. in his tent | Ottawa Citizen

Meet Rare Sea Wolves Who Live Off The Ocean And Can Swim For Hours | Bored Panda

Along the wild Pacific coast of British Columbia, there lives a population of the sea wolves. “We know from exhaustive DNA studies that these wolves are genetically distinct from their continental kin,” says McAllister. “They are behaviourally distinct, swimming from island to island and preying on sea animals. They are also morphologically distinct — they are smaller in size and physically different from their mainland counterparts,” says Ian McAllister, an award-winning photographer who has been studying these animals for almost two decades.

Source: Meet Rare Sea Wolves Who Live Off The Ocean And Can Swim For Hours | Bored Panda

Wolf that attacked dog euthanized in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve | CTV Vancouver Island News

Officials at Pacific Rim National Park Reserve have killed a wolf they say was responsible for two attacks on leashed dogs, including one over the weekend.Parks Canada staff say the wolf was involved in multiple incidents in the Long Beach area of the reserve, and the most recent attack occurred Sunday morning.It happened on a trail just below Green Point Campground, said Renee Wissink, manager of resource conservation for the park.“Very bold behaviour, very close to people,” said Wissink. “While the attack was still focused on the dog, the proximity to people was just way too close and we can’t jeopardize visitor safety.”

Source: Wolf that attacked dog euthanized in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve | CTV Vancouver Island News

Beat it, beaver: Grey wolf wins Canada’s Greatest Animal contest – Calgary – CBC News

After a ferocious seven-week contest, the grey wolf has finally risen to the top to claim the crown of Canada’s Greatest Animal.There will be no official coronation, however, the designation is the culmination of a contest put on by the Calgary Zoo in honour of Canada’s 150th birthday. Wolf leads the pack in Calgary Zoo’s Greatest Animal contestMore than 11,000 ballots were cast in the campaign, the zoo said in a release. The grey wolf faced fierce competition, but ultimately it beat out fellow Canadian animal icons like the grizzly bear, bison, whooping crane, Rocky Mountain goat, great grey owl and, obviously, the beaver.The wolf took 26 per cent of the ballots cast and beat out its buck-toothed rival by around 500 votes.

Source: Beat it, beaver: Grey wolf wins Canada’s Greatest Animal contest – Calgary – CBC News

The solitary, island-hopping wolf at the edge of the Salish Sea | backyard-wildlife | Earth Touch News

Staqeya’s appearance on British Columbia’s Discovery Island was so improbable that authorities initially assumed locals were mistaking free-roaming dogs for a wolf. After all, the Chatham-Discovery archipelago – partly Songhees land, partly a provincial park and other government-owned acreage – lies just off the most built-up corner of Vancouver Island: metro Victoria, home to nearly 400,000 people. The closest known wolves roam some 20 to 30 miles west of the city.It’s not clear why or how Staqeya navigated greater Victoria to the shores of Oak Bay and beyond, but wolf is what the shaggy beast of Discovery Island turned out to be. In the spring of 2012, residents reported a roving canid around Elk Lake to the north of the city; in May, he was seen at Albert Head to the southwest. At some point soon after, he disembarked for the Chatham-Discovery Islands, though from where exactly is unclear.

Source: The solitary, island-hopping wolf at the edge of the Salish Sea | backyard-wildlife | Earth Touch News