Wolf Relocation Bill Passes House – NewsRadio 560 KPQ

The Washington State House passed a bill yesterday that would include relocation as part of the wolf conservation and management plan used in the state. The bill was sponsored by Joel Kretz of Wauconda who said, “If there isn’t the political will to follow the federal government’s lead to de-list the wolves in my legislative district, than maybe we can export a few to help even things a bit.” The bill directs the Department of Fish and Wildlife to use the best available science to determine potential translocation sites and stresses expediency. Kretz says the wolves need to be spread so that it can speed up recovery goals.

Source: Wolf Relocation Bill Passes House – NewsRadio 560 KPQ

Algonquin wolf population declines due to multiple threats | NCPR News

A wilderness protection agency says Ontario’s Algonquin wolves are quickly disappearing because hunting, trapping, road building and increasing breeding with coyotes that dilutes the gene pool.Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society is urging the provincial government to eliminate hunting and trapping of Algonquin wolves within a recovery zone as well as protect its habitat by limiting and reducing roads.

Source: Algonquin wolf population declines due to multiple threats | NCPR News

Lawsuits say Mexican grey wolf recovery plan is flawed | National Post

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — U.S. wildlife managers failed to adopt a recovery plan for the endangered Mexican grey wolf that would protect against illegal killings and the consequences of inbreeding, according to lawsuits filed Tuesday by environmentalists.Two coalitions of environmental groups filed separate complaints in federal court in Arizona, marking the latest challenges in a decades-long battle over efforts to re-establish the predator in its historic range in the American Southwest and northern Mexico.

Source: Lawsuits say Mexican grey wolf recovery plan is flawed | National Post

Documentation of wolves near Oregon’s Mt Hood new benchmark | National Post

THE DALLES, Ore. — A remote camera picked up two grey wolves in Oregon’s northern Cascade Mountains, marking the first time multiple wolves have been documented in the area since the species returned to Oregon more than a decade ago.The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said Tuesday the animals were spotted in the White River Wildlife Area and in Mt. Hood National Forest, as well as on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation.

Source: Documentation of wolves near Oregon’s Mt Hood new benchmark | National Post

Conservationists line up against ending wolf management

MADISON, Wis. — Conservationists pushed back Wednesday against a bill that would end state wolf management efforts and bar state police from investigating wolf poaching, saying the measure will open the door to indiscriminate wolf hunts and won’t help get the animals off the federal endangered species list.The bill will create a perception that hunting wolves is permissible even though the practice would remain illegal under both state and federal law, they said during an Assembly natural resources committee hearing. And they warned that wolf advocacy groups will seize on the legislation to argue to Congress that Wisconsin can’t manage wolves and the animals should remain on the endangered species list.

Source: Conservationists line up against ending wolf management

Eight wolves shot on first day of Sweden’s hunt – The Local

The licensed hunt started on Tuesday.Campaigners had appealed to the highest administrative court in Sweden less than a week before the start of the hunt. The Supreme Administrative Court has not yet decided whether or not to grant them leave to appeal, but said it would not call off the hunt at the eleventh hour in the meantime.Eight wolves were shot on Tuesday, two of whom were found to have scabies, reports hunting magazine Svensk Jakt.

Source: Eight wolves shot on first day of Sweden’s hunt – The Local