Wolves return to Profanity Peak pack area | The Spokesman-Review

Wolf pack activity has been documented by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife officials in the former Profanity Peak pack area.Seven members of the Profanity Peak pack were removed in 2016 by WDFW officials. WDFW officials are working with ranchers to develop non-lethal deterrence methods in advance of the grazing season. The Profanity Peak pack was located in Ferry County.

Source: Wolves return to Profanity Peak pack area | The Spokesman-Review

Federal Government Reviewing Removing Gray Wolf From Endangered Species List | Wisconsin Public Radio

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is reviewing the status of the gray wolf under the Endangered Species Act and could introduce a proposal that could lead to a loss of federal protections for the species.In an emailed statement, USFWS spokeswoman Georgia Parham said the agency is working closely with federal, tribal and local partners to assess scientific data related to the wolf’s historic range, population and recovery.”If appropriate, the Service will publish a proposal to revise the wolf’s status in the Federal Register by the end of the calendar year,” said Parham. “Any proposal will follow a robust, transparent and open public process that will provide opportunity for public comment.”Gray wolves were delisted in the western Great Lakes region, which includes Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan by the Fish and Wildlife Service in 2011. The next year, Republicans in the Wisconsin Legislature established a controversial wolf hunting season. That lasted until 2014 when a federal judge ruled that the USFWS didn’t follow proper procedures by not accounting for things like how a loss of habitat may impact wolf recovery. The 2014 federal ruling also ended the state’s wolf hunt.

Source: Federal Government Reviewing Removing Gray Wolf From Endangered Species List | Wisconsin Public Radio

How to achieve a peaceful coexistence between wolves and humans — ScienceDaily

The persecution of wolves in order to remove them from human settlements has culminated in their near-disappearance in numerous European countries, like Spain and Sweden. Following a recovery of the species, a team of scientists has determined what geographic areas in the Scandinavian country would be most suitable for a redistribution of the specie’s range, in the interests of increasing the social acceptance of wolves.

Source: How to achieve a peaceful coexistence between wolves and humans — ScienceDaily

Wolves Identified by Unique Howls, May Help Rare Species

If any gray wolves are howling their discontent with a recent proposal to remove what remains of their U.S. federal protection, scientists can now identify the outspoken.A new, more sophisticated method for analyzing sound recordings of wild wolf howls can, with absolute accuracy, tell individual wolves apart-and may even help save the old dog, according to a new paper in the journal Bioacoustics.Study leader Holly Root-Gutteridge and colleagues at Nottingham Trent University in the U.K., working with recordings of wild wolves mostly from Algonquin Provincial Park (map) in Ontario, Canada, also found the technique can distinguish a single animal from a chorus of howlers with 97.4 percent accuracy. The team had previously used the method with captive wolves, but this is the first time it’s worked with wild wolf songs and all the ambient sounds that go with them.

Source: Wolves Identified by Unique Howls, May Help Rare Species

Ranchers, advocates square off on Mexican gray wolf

In November 2011, Mexican officials found the carcass of a Mexican gray wolf near a ranch in Sonora, poisoned and left to die.A few weeks later, in December, officials found three more dead wolves, all poisoned, their skin showing similar lesions. The wolves belonged to the first Mexican gray wolf pack released from captivity onto the Mexican landscape since private and government eradication campaigns nearly drove the species extinct in the middle of the last century.

Source: Ranchers, advocates square off on Mexican gray wolf

Wolves adjust sleeping habits to avoid human contact, research suggests | CBC News

New research has found some carnivores in Kananaskis Country have altered their behaviour in response to the presence of humans.The results come from a University of Victoria master’s student, who studied data from motion-triggered cameras in Kananaskis and the more remote Willmore Wilderness Park north of Jasper.Sandra Frey says she noticed wolves in K-Country became more nocturnal so as not to bump into people during the day.

Source: Wolves adjust sleeping habits to avoid human contact, research suggests | CBC News