Survey: More Mexican gray wolves roam Southwest | Livestock | postregister.com

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — More Mexican gray wolves are roaming the American Southwest now than at any time since federal biologists began reintroducing the predators more than two decades ago, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Monday.Agency officials declared progress for the endangered species in New Mexico and Arizona, saying there are at least 131 wolves in the wild in the two states. That represents a 12% jump in the population.Ranchers and others in rural communities within the mountain ranges that border wolf territory have pushed back against the reintroduction program, citing livestock kills and safety concerns.Federal wildlife managers have been working with partners in Arizona, the White Mountain Apache Tribe and the Mexican government to mitigate concerns related to the reintroduction on both sides of the international border, but ranchers in New Mexico and Arizona continue to document conflicts that range from cattle deaths to nuisance reports.

Source: Survey: More Mexican gray wolves roam Southwest | Livestock | postregister.com

Yellowstone Elk Don’t Budge For Wolves – Eurasia Review

Elk roam the winter range that straddles the northern boundary of Yellowstone National Park with little regard for wolves, according to a new study illustrating how elk can tolerate living in close proximity to the large predator.The study offers new insight into how wolves can have negligible impacts on elk movements, and how elk may simply ignore the risk of wolf predation while navigating the landscape in search of forage. It also adds to a growing body of evidence that changes in elk distribution and vegetation conditions in northern Yellowstone since wolf reintroduction in the mid-1990s are not caused by wolves altering elk movement behavior.

Source: Yellowstone Elk Don’t Budge For Wolves – Eurasia Review

German environment minister Schulze takes aim at wolves | News | DW | 03.03.2019

Farmers should be allowed to shoot wolves that cause “serious agricultural damage,” Germany’s Environment Minister Svenja Schulze said in an interview. She aims to change the laws that are protecting the predators.

Source: German environment minister Schulze takes aim at wolves | News | DW | 03.03.2019

Canadian Wolves Released at Isle Royale – Isle Royale National Park (U.S. National Park Service)

HOUGHTON, MICH- During a narrow weather window between storms last week, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) successfully transferred four wolves to Isle Royale National Park. Earlier this winter, severe weather on both sides of the border hampered the ability to capture and transfer wolves. However, NPS staff worked diligently with ONMRF and over the course of four days successfully translocated Canadian wolves. Two mainland wolves, one female and one male from the same pack and both with a black coat color variation, were captured on crown land near Wawa, Ontario, and transferred to Isle Royale. Weather cleared long enough on Thursday to provide an opportunity to access Michipicoten Island Provincial Park, where two males were captured.

Source: Canadian Wolves Released at Isle Royale – Isle Royale National Park (U.S. National Park Service)

Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives | UW News

As gray wolves continue to make a strong comeback in Washington state, their presence can’t help but impact other animals — particularly the ones these large carnivores target as prey.White-tailed deer and mule deer, two distinct species common in Washington, are among wolves’ favorite catch. Wolves will chase deer great distances — sometimes upwards of 6 miles (10 kilometers) — in search of a satisfying meal. How these two deer species respond to the threat of being pursued by wolves in the early years of this predator’s return could shed light on changes to their behavior and numbers.

Source: Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives | UW News

Gray wolf OR-54’s return to Nevada County part of ‘dispersal’ activity | TheUnion.com

Nevada County certainly has its fair share of wildlife, from the more commonly spotted deer and turkeys to the more elusive foxes, coyotes, mountain lions, bears and ring-tailed cats.But the news that a gray wolf known as OR-54 — deemed “a traveling maniac” by one wolf expert — was tracked to Nevada County this January drew widespread interest. The nearly 3-year-old female wolf, born into Oregon’s Rogue Pack, was making her second visit since an initial foray in June of last year.

Source: Gray wolf OR-54’s return to Nevada County part of ‘dispersal’ activity | TheUnion.com

Pictures and video: men rescue wolf they mistake for a dog – Estonian news

Construction workers saved what they believed was a dog but later turned out to be a wolf trapped on the ice on the Sindi dam. Rando Kartsepp, Robin Sillamäe and Erki Väli are doing dredging work on the dam. When they arrived at the site this morning, the men noticed an animal trapped on the dam, swimming in a soup of ice.

Source: Pictures and video: men rescue wolf they mistake for a dog – Estonian news