Tracking collars on new Isle Royale wolves show there is 1 spot they won’t go | MLive.com

ISLE ROYALE, MI – In the last couple months, the new wolves transplanted onto Michigan’s remote Isle Royale have had a lot of privacy to explore their new home. The 206-square-mile national park is closed to visitors for the season, and the researchers behind the effort to boost the island’s dwindling wolf population are giving the new arrivals a hands-off approach.But the GPS tracking collars the new wolves were fitted with are showing just how well they are covering their new territory – and one spot on the island they’d rather not go.Of the four wolves trapped on tribal lands in nearby Grand Portage, Minnesota, and released on Isle Royale, the movements of three females are currently being monitored. The fourth wolf, a male, died weeks after being released on the island. The cause of his death has not yet been disclosed.This week, the park service released new information about where on the island the new wolves have been venturing. Take a look at the GPS track map below, and we’ll explain what you’re seeing.

Source: Tracking collars on new Isle Royale wolves show there is 1 spot they won’t go | MLive.com

Record number of Mexican gray wolves found dead in 2018

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) – Wildlife managers have confirmed a record number of Mexican gray wolves have been reported dead this year, fueling concerns about the decades-long effort to return the endangered predator to the southwestern U.S.Five wolves were found dead in New Mexico in November, bringing the total for the year to 17. That marks the most wolves killed in any single year since the reintroduction effort began in 1998, and it’s one of the deadliest months in the program’s history.

Source: Record number of Mexican gray wolves found dead in 2018

OP-ED: On the edge of extinction: Why we should save the red wolf | Opinion | technicianonline.com

nstead of seeking to dominate and control the Earth, we should respect and live in harmony with all of the creatures in it. We do not have the right, as humans, to determine which species can stay and which can go. For this reason, we should do everything in our power to help and protect those that cannot protect themselves.The survival of the red wolf is in jeopardy, mostly due to human encroachment and unregulated hunting. As of now, it is the most critically endangered mammal in the world and without intervention and protection, it will soon become extinct. The red wolf is the only species of wolf that is native and unique to the United States.

Source: OP-ED: On the edge of extinction: Why we should save the red wolf | Opinion | technicianonline.com

Conservation of our lobo, the Mexican gray wolf – The Field – AGU Blogosphere

Last Tuesday, a crew of 11 dedicated students left Albuquerque before the sun was even hinting at its return to the sky to help conserve one of the most endangered subspecies of wolves in the world: our lobo, the Mexican gray wolf.This, the rarest subspecies of wolf in North America, was historically common in the Southwest until it was hunted, trapped, and poisoned to near extinction in the 1970’s. Since 1977, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has been working to conserve this species as part of an international effort to capture, breed, and release wolves back into the wilds of New Mexico, Arizona, and Mexico. Here in the state of New Mexico, there are multiple pre-release wolf facilities, including one on the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NWR).The 11 students, hailing from Bosque School, Amy Biehl High School, and the University of New Mexico braved freezing temperatures and a very early wake up call to help capture and transfer two yearling male wolves from Sevilleta NWR to a facility in California where they will hopefully be paired with female wolves. In order to capture these individuals, a human wall was formed to walk the naturally fearful wolves into a corner den box where they were restrained by experienced personnel. The wolves were then given subcutaneous hydrating fluids (a saline solution injected into the space under the skin, to be absorbed by the body during their long journey), placed in a crate, and sent on their way. Led by the awesome women of the USFWS Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, this operation depended on our student team to assist in the capture, administer the subcutaneous fluids, and help carry the crated wolves to the transport van.

Source: Conservation of our lobo, the Mexican gray wolf – The Field – AGU Blogosphere

House of Representatives votes to delist gray wolves, bill’s future uncertain in Senate | The Spokesman-Review

In a July interview with the Revelator – a news site published by the Center For Biological Diversity – former government trapper and wolf recovery expert Carter Niemeyer said wolf recovery can continue with or without federal protection now that there is a sustainable wolf population.“I think a lot people mistake an ESA listing as a permanent state of affairs, but it was never meant to function that way,” he said in the interview. “Other regions that fall outside of ESA recovery areas, like Colorado, still need more time for wolf numbers to increase, and I think they will. Wolves are prolific and resilient and I believe they will ultimately succeed in most areas where basic habitat needs, open space and abundant prey are all available — and all of this can happen even without ESA protection.”

Source: House of Representatives votes to delist gray wolves, bill’s future uncertain in Senate | The Spokesman-Review

Habituated wolf’s death may leave lasting legacy | Environmental | jhnewsandguide.com

Wolf biologist Doug Smith wants to smarten up Yellowstone’s wolves.As Yellowstone National Park’s senior wildlife biologist, Smith has witnessed naive, habituated wolves being hunted down easily outside of the park, where people can legally point rifles instead of cameras. Since wolf hunting seasons outside the 2.2-million-acre park’s borders in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming aren’t going to come to an end, Smith wants to start teaching wolves a life-saving lesson: People aren’t safe.“Right now, if they’re crossing the road we may leave them alone,” Smith told the News&Guide this week. “Now we’re thinking of pounding them. If you get close to people, you’re going to get hit.”

Source: Habituated wolf’s death may leave lasting legacy | Environmental | jhnewsandguide.com

Yellowstone wolf: 926F Spitfire killed by a hunter – The Washington Post

It was a chance encounter between Marc Cooke and 926F.The wolf looked as though it could be a dog. It paced about 50 yards off the road where Cooke’s wife spotted the female, closer than most wolves got to human admirers at Yellowstone National Park. The trip was her first time out with her husband to search for the predators.Cooke snapped a picture of the wolf that some enthusiasts call Spitfire.That was in August 2012, a few months before a hunter legally killed Spitfire’s mother outside the park.The pack leader was affectionately known as “06” to her followers, for the year she was born, and Cooke watched her from afar for years, he told The Washington Post on Sunday.

Source: Yellowstone wolf: 926F Spitfire killed by a hunter – The Washington Post