Rift in Oregon’s stance on gray wolves;

SALEM — Slapping down a stance taken by the director of Oregon’s wildlife department, Gov. Kate Brown declared Wednesday that the state and its agencies oppose the federal government’s proposal to take the gray wolf off the endangered species list.Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Director Curtis Melcher had written May 9 to a federal agency in support of the proposal, saying that in the Lower 48 states and Mexico, the gray wolf no longer meets the definition of an endangered or threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act.Conservation groups and an Oregon congressman blasted Melcher’s position after the letter, which had not been publicly announced, came to light this week. Then Brown herself weighed in Wednesday in a letter to U.S. Interior Secretary David Bernhardt, saying she wanted to “clarify and ­correct” Melcher.

Source: Rift in Oregon’s stance on gray wolves;

Wolves return to Germany – along with anti-immigrant hostilities | The Independent

They struck at dawn and left a trail of blood and body parts. There were six, maybe seven perpetrators. One had calmly passed Annett Hertweck’s car as she was speeding down the forest path to the scene of the massacre near the eastern village of Forstgen, Germany. Only then did she see the bodies. Dozens of them.“It was horrific,” she says. The culprits were wolves, descended from Polish forebears. The victims were German sheep, 55 of them. Extinct for the best part of a century, Germany’s most notorious fairytale baddie is back. Wolves have been slipping across the Polish border for years, gradually settling into rural Germany. There are only a few hundred of them.But to hear some politicians tell it, the country is facing an invasion. And the way they talk about wolves is strikingly similar to how they talk about immigrants, turning the animal into an object of terror – and the discussion into an allegory for the nation’s simmering culture wars. Between urban elites and rural left-behinds. Between west and east. And also between those who welcome wolves – and immigrants – and those who fear them.

Source: Wolves return to Germany – along with anti-immigrant hostilities | The Independent

Pastirski psi: Odkar imajo tornjake, je čreda ovac neokrnjena | Dnevnik

Andrej in Aleš Sedmak sta že pred leti ugotovila, da so tornjaki zelo dobri pastirski psi, če jih pravilno vzgojiš. To so spoznali tudi na Zavodu za gozdove Slovenije, ki bo rejcem drobnice financiral dve tretjini stroškov ob nakupu tornjaka.

Source: Pastirski psi: Odkar imajo tornjake, je čreda ovac neokrnjena | Dnevnik

Wolf update includes new pack in Walla Walla area | Walla Walla County | union-bulletin.com

During an hourlong talk, Steve Pozzanghera, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Region 1 director, briefed commissioners on the latest status of the gray wolf population and what’s on the horizon for the growing population in the state and locally, where a new pack has been identified.At the start of his presentation, Pozzanghera said he has been spending a lot of time in Northeast Washington talking with county commissioners about gray wolves “and as we see additional packs now starting to reside in the Blue Mountains … I think these dialogues are going to become more common.”

Source: Wolf update includes new pack in Walla Walla area | Walla Walla County | union-bulletin.com

Rep. Earl Blumenauer to Attend Portland Rally Against Removal of Gray Wolf From Endangered Species List – Willamette Week

On March 6, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, under newly appointed Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt, announced plans to remove the gray wolf from the Endangered Species list.Now wildlife conservationists in Portland are protesting, saying the move would allow for trophy hunting and trapping of the animals. At last count, there were 137 known gray wolves in Oregon.

Source: Rep. Earl Blumenauer to Attend Portland Rally Against Removal of Gray Wolf From Endangered Species List – Willamette Week

National Parks Study Wolf Deaths As Agency Plans Delisting Endangered Species | MTPR

Federal wildlife managers are gearing up to remove gray wolves from the Endangered Species List. But some environmentalists say the species isn’t ready and that the government is basing its decision on outdated science. A group of biologists in four western national parks are looking at the impacts of wolf deaths on their packs and how this could affect the greater population.

Source: National Parks Study Wolf Deaths As Agency Plans Delisting Endangered Species | MTPR