Ranchers, advocates square off on Mexican gray wolf

In November 2011, Mexican officials found the carcass of a Mexican gray wolf near a ranch in Sonora, poisoned and left to die.A few weeks later, in December, officials found three more dead wolves, all poisoned, their skin showing similar lesions. The wolves belonged to the first Mexican gray wolf pack released from captivity onto the Mexican landscape since private and government eradication campaigns nearly drove the species extinct in the middle of the last century.

Source: Ranchers, advocates square off on Mexican gray wolf

Wolves adjust sleeping habits to avoid human contact, research suggests | CBC News

New research has found some carnivores in Kananaskis Country have altered their behaviour in response to the presence of humans.The results come from a University of Victoria master’s student, who studied data from motion-triggered cameras in Kananaskis and the more remote Willmore Wilderness Park north of Jasper.Sandra Frey says she noticed wolves in K-Country became more nocturnal so as not to bump into people during the day.

Source: Wolves adjust sleeping habits to avoid human contact, research suggests | CBC News

Here’s why there are so many coyotes and why they are spreading so fast – The Washington Post

Coyotes were a purely North American animal that lived in the West. Now they’re everywhere, and state-sponsored hunting that obliterated wolves and mountain lions is a major reason.

Source: Here’s why there are so many coyotes and why they are spreading so fast – The Washington Post

Arizona Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project Monthly Update

Arizona – -(Ammoland.com)-The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf. For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit wmatoutdoors.org.

Source: Arizona Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project Monthly Update

Wolf researcher who accused WSU of silencing him gets $300K to settle lawsuit and go away | The Seattle Times

A leading wolf researcher has agreed to leave Washington State University at the end of the spring term in return for $300,000 to settle a suit he brought over infringement of his academic freedom.Robert Wielgus, director of the Carnivore Conservation Lab at Washington State University, pioneered research of wolf behavior in cattle country as the predators began their return to Washington.

Source: Wolf researcher who accused WSU of silencing him gets $300K to settle lawsuit and go away | The Seattle Times