News Releases – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

PORTLAND, Ore. — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is offering a $5,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of the person(s) responsible for killing a federally protected gray wolf in south-central Oregon.On April 23, 2017, a canid carcass was found about 20 miles northwest of Klamath Falls on Fremont-Winema National Forest. The carcass was sent to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s Forensics Labs in Ashland, Oregon, for a necropsy, which determined that it was a male gray wolf known as OR-33, and that it died from gunshot wounds. The Service does not have an estimated date of when it was shot.OR-33 dispersed from the Imnaha Pack in northeastern Oregon in November 2015, and was not known to be part of any pack. The approximately 4-year-old wolf had a collar, but it quit transmitting in August 2016.It is a violation of the Endangered Species Act to kill a gray wolf, which is listed as endangered in the western two-thirds of Oregon. It is also a violation of Oregon state game laws. The Oregon State Police and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are investigating the incident.Anyone with information about this case should call the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at (503) 682-6131, or Oregon State Police Tip Line at (800) 452-7888. Callers may remain anonymous.

Source: News Releases – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Working with wolves: Local rancher tries new approach

An ongoing effort to reduce risks to livestock in wolf ranges has produced a new strategy being promoted by one Siskiyou County rancher whose livestock roams in the range of the first recorded wolfpack in California in decades.An ongoing effort to reduce risks to livestock in wolf ranges has produced a new strategy being promoted by one Siskiyou County rancher whose livestock roams in the range of the first recorded wolfpack in California in decades.Butte Valley rancher Mark Coats has been involved in efforts to address wolf-livestock issues since OR-7 – the first wolf documented as having entered state in nearly a century – entered California in 2011.

Source: Working with wolves: Local rancher tries new approach

Red Cliff Tribe To Trap, Collar Wolves This Fall | Wisconsin Public Radio

One northern Wisconsin tribe will begin trapping and tracking wolves in the Bayfield Peninsula this fall.The Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa received a roughly $75,000 grant from the Bureau of Indian Affairs to help the tribe track wolves. Jeremy St. Arnold, tribal wildlife and forestry biologist, said the money will pay for traps and satellite collars to pinpoint wolf movements.”We’re curious if they harass farms, if they harass bear dogs and things like that,” he said. “We’re trying to mitigate conflict and learn as much about these packs as we can.”The tribe plans to collar two packs this fall and expand wolf-tracking as more funding becomes available. St. Arnold said they’ll begin collaring the Little Sioux River and Echo Valley packs. As of this May, there were at least 13 wolves in the Echo Valley pack. There are at least six wolf packs around the Red Cliff reservation.

Source: Red Cliff Tribe To Trap, Collar Wolves This Fall | Wisconsin Public Radio

Hunters down a dozen wolves | Environmental | jhnewsandguide.com

Wyoming hunters were successful tracking down and killing smart, stealthy wolves as the season began Sunday.A dozen wolves were legally harvested in the first 40 hours of the three-month season. It’s a number that amounts to over a quarter of the total wolves that can be killed in the state’s managed hunt area. Wyoming Game and Fish Department carnivore manager Ken Mills attributed the considerable success to the opener falling on a weekend, winter weather pushing lots of sportsmen into the field, and also a species that may temporarily have lost its fear of mankind.

Source: Hunters down a dozen wolves | Environmental | jhnewsandguide.com

Baffin Island Wolf

Facts about Baffin Island Wolfs. “Scientific name for Baffin Island Wolf is Canis lupus manningi”. The Baffin Island Wolf is a sub variety of Gray Wolf that belongs to the genus Canis of the Canidae family. The Baffin Island Wolf can be commonly called the Baffin Island Tundra wolf and they mostly survive on the Baffin Island and on a number of nearby islands. Until 1943, the Baffin Island wolf breed was not officially acknowledged as a sub variety, where it was given its taxonomic categorization by the State of Anderson. Early reports and proofs suggest that the Baffin Island Wolves migrated in western Greenland from Baffin Island, and hence, they are the successors of the subspecies of the Baffin Island Wolf. The Baffin Island Wolf is categorized as an endangered animal, owing to home obliteration, like the rainforest, introduction of disease, exotic species, water contamination, global warming and excessive use of natural resources.

Source: Baffin Island Wolf – Knowledge Base LookSeek.com

State Ends Wolf Killing After 2 Months Without Cattle Attack | Washington News | US News

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — The state Department of Fish and Wildlife says efforts to kill members of a wolf pack north of Spokane have ended.The agency said Tuesday that wolves from the Smackout pack have shown no signs of preying on livestock in Stevens County since July when state wildlife managers trapped and killed two of its members.Agency wolf manager Donny Martorello says the wolves killed were a 30-pound female and a 70-pound female.Martorello says officials took that action after documenting four instances of predation on livestock over 10 months. He says under their wolf-removal protocol, the pattern of predation on calves belonging to three ranchers met the threshold for lethal removal.

Source: State Ends Wolf Killing After 2 Months Without Cattle Attack | Washington News | US News