Germany wants looser rules on shooting wolves | The Japan Times

BERLIN – Germany’s agriculture minister wants to loosen restrictions on shooting wolves to reduce a growing population that threatens sheep and goats.Wolves disappeared from Germany a century ago after many were killed, in part because they are symbols of cunning and wickedness in German folklore but also because they attack farm animals and even humans.They have made a comeback across Germany, and the ministry says more than 600 now roam a northern belt from the border with Poland and the Czech Republic to the Dutch frontier.Wolves killed more than 1,000 farm animals in 2016, said the ministry. Farmers say their animals are being ravaged and hunters say wolves eat game they want to shoot and even damage trees.

Source: Germany wants looser rules on shooting wolves | The Japan Times

Government shutdown threatens wolf and moose winter survey on Michigan’s Isle Royale | mlive.com

ISLE ROYALE, MI – Just months after the National Park Service started a relocation program to trap and transport new wolves to Michigan’s remote Isle Royale in hopes of boosting the dwindling pack, a winter survey that will give researchers their first peek at how the new wolves are fitting into their new home might be called off because of the ongoing federal government shutdown.Staff from the research project posted a message Sunday night on the Wolves and Moose of Isle Royale Facebook page, alerting their followers that the winter survey, typically done by plane, might be grounded this year.

Source: Government shutdown threatens wolf and moose winter survey on Michigan’s Isle Royale | mlive.com

Grant program aims to deter Mexican wolf, cattle conflicts

PHOENIX (AP) – Arizona ranchers can now apply for grants as part of an effort to research measures that could prevent conflicts between livestock and Mexican gray wolves.The Arizona Game and Fish Department announced Thursday that the livestock loss board unanimously approved the grant program at its meeting in November. Arizona ranchers applying for the funds are required to provide a match either in cash or in-kind and/or third-party funds. They must also document the method to avoid conflict being used and its effectiveness.

Source: Grant program aims to deter Mexican wolf, cattle conflicts

Rischio ibridazione per il lupo italiano – National Geographic

‘è un problema con i lupi in Italia. Non è che sono pochi, come quando negli anni ’70 ne rimaneva un centinaio, né che sono troppi. È che i circa duemila lupi italiani forse non sono tutti lupi.La vera minaccia per la loro sopravvivenza è infatti l’ibridazione, l’accoppiamento con i cani che rischia di portare il lupo verso l’estinzione genetica. Non solo randagi ma anche cani da caccia dispersi, cani di proprietà liberi nei parchi ma soprattutto cani da guardiania come i maremmani abruzzesi, usati storicamente per tenere i predatori alla larga dal bestiame.

Source: Rischio ibridazione per il lupo italiano – National Geographic

‘Carnivore cleansing’ is damaging ecosystems, scientists warn | Environment | The Guardian

A plea to restore populations of some of the world’s most dangerous animals has been made by scientists who claim the loss of large carnivores is damaging ecosystems.More than three-quarters of the 31 species of large land predators, such as lions and wolves, are in decline, according to a new study. Of these, 17 species are now restricted to less than half the territory they once occupied.Large carnivores have already been exterminated in many developed regions, including western Europe and eastern United States – and the same pattern of “carnivore cleansing” is being repeated throughout the world, said scientists.

Source: ‘Carnivore cleansing’ is damaging ecosystems, scientists warn | Environment | The Guardian

Descendants of historic Pennsylvania wolves live in Montana | Outdoors | helenair.com

BRIDGER — In the dry sagebrush foothills west of here, sheltered in the rain shadow of the imposing Beartooth Mountains, lives an unusual bit of Pennsylvania history — 35 descendants of the McCleery buffalo wolves.“It’s just a fascinating story, the history of these animals,” said Diane Gallegos, executive director of Wolf Haven International, a Tenino, Washington-based wolf rescue group.Gallegos’ foundation became the new owners of the captive wolves this year, taking over a legacy that dates back to 1921. That’s when Edward McCleery — a Kane, Pennsylvania, physician — began buying wolf pups as animals were being exterminated across the West for killing livestock. His first purchase was of a captive 9-month-old wolf from a Sheridan, Wyoming, zoo.

Source: Descendants of historic Pennsylvania wolves live in Montana | Outdoors | helenair.com

More wolves shot amid boycott fears / Norway

Norway’s wolf hunts, demanded mostly by farmers determined to allow their livestock to graze freely, have always been controversial. This one is especially so, because it allows hunting in an area that had been set aside as a protected zone where wolves would be allowed to exist.Government officials’ decision to allow the hunt over the protests of environmental and wildlife conservationists prompted activists just over the border in Sweden to try to sabotage it on Tuesday. A group called “Hunt Saboteurs Sweden” announced that they had localized the hunters and knew where they’d be gathering.

Source: More wolves shot amid boycott fears