Minnesota wolf population jumps 25 percent | Duluth News Tribune

Minnesota wolf population jumps 25 percentBy John Myers Today at 12:21 p.m.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to Facebook38Share to TwitterShare to RedditShare to EmailShare to Copy LinkA gray wolf looks out from a snow-covered shelter. USFWS photoMinnesota’s wolf population jumped 25 percent in the past year, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources said Monday, thanks in part to an increasing northern deer herd.The DNR said its annual survey showed an estimated 2,856 wolves spread among 500 packs, up from 2,278 wolves in the 2015-2016 survey.Wolf numbers had remained flat for several years before this year’s jump,DNR officials said the wolf numbers are up because there are more deer in northern Minnesota for them to eat. Higher deer densities allow for more wolves, biologists said. Deer numbers in the wolf range are up about 22 percent over last year.But wolf numbers also have recovered after two years of not being hunted or trapped. Minnesota held hunting and trapping seasons in 2012, 2013 and 2014 before a federal judge in December 2014 ended state wolf management and declared the animals again protected.

Source: Minnesota wolf population jumps 25 percent | Duluth News Tribune

Forest Service tried to quash paper debunking Montana wildlife authority | State & Regional | missoulian.com

The U.S. Forest Service has disavowed a legal analysis it commissioned that showed federal land managers have given state wildlife departments more authority than they really possess. In June, the agency asked the University of Montana to remove the draft report five days after “Fish and Wildlife Management on Federal Lands: Debunking State Supremacy” appeared on the Bolle Center for People and Forest’s website.

Source: Forest Service tried to quash paper debunking Montana wildlife authority | State & Regional | missoulian.com

Museum of Life and Science prepares to say goodbye to its red wolf family, preps for transfer to New York :: WRAL.com

The Museum of Life and Science’s red wolf families has a big move scheduled this fall.The Durham museum announced that the endangered red wolves will move on Nov. 6 to the Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, N.Y., which will provide an expanded, one-acre habitat for the family of six. The transfer comes at the recommendation of the Red Wolf Species Survival Plan. The family’s move will be followed closely by the arrival of a new red wolf breeding pair to the museum.

Source: Museum of Life and Science prepares to say goodbye to its red wolf family, preps for transfer to New York :: WRAL.com

Gary Feest: Wolves are critical to healthy deer, and maybe human, population | Opinion | host.madison.com

Dear Editor: Europeans began settling Wisconsin in the early 1800s, and at the time as many as 3,000 to 5,000 wolves may have existed in the area. By 1950, less than 50 remained in extreme northern Wisconsin. A decade later, the animals were considered extinct in the state. In 1975, wolves were listed as a state endangered species as they began to recolonize along the Minnesota border. Wolves were not reintroduced into Wisconsin, but moved in on their own. The wolf population in Wisconsin is currently estimated to be around 900 or so. There is an artificially low number — 350 or less — that’s been touted as the “optimal” number of wolves that should be in the state.

Source: Gary Feest: Wolves are critical to healthy deer, and maybe human, population | Opinion | host.madison.com

Mexican Gray Wolf Lethally Removed from the Wild

ANTA FE (Sept. 15, 2017) – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced today that for the first time in over a decade, a Mexican gray wolf, or lobo, was lethally removed in Arizona due to conflicts with livestock.Bryan Bird, Southwest program director for Defenders of Wildlife, issued the following statement:“We strongly condemn the killing of this Mexican gray wolf. The lobo is the world’s most endangered subspecies of gray wolf, and there are too few in the wild for any to be removed. News of this wolf’s killing is particularly devastating since it has been over a decade since the last lobo was lethally removed from the wild for conflicts with livestock.

Source: Mexican Gray Wolf Lethally Removed from the Wild

Wyoming Wolf Hunt on for this October

Wyoming Hunters will be able to take wolves again.October first will start the first wolf hunting season in the Cowboy state since 2013.Hunters took 43 wolves in the state’s first modern wolf hunt in 2012.Wyoming’s Game and Fish Department cut the next year’s quota. Only 23 wolves were killed then.The state’s large carnivore biologist Dan Thompson said the upcoming wolf season will be a lot like the 2012-2013 seasons.

Source: Wyoming Wolf Hunt on for this October