Litter of endangered Mexican gray wolf pups born at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo | gazette.com

“Until now, none of the breeding pairs have been successful,” the release says. “Luna’s successful pregnancy is notable because she has very valuable and underrepresented genetics that the SSP was eager to have carried on in the captive population. When they are older, it is possible that Luna’s pups could be released to the wild to help provide genetic diversity in the wild, as well.”The pups’ father is Navarro, who came to Cheyenne Mountain Zoo last November. His genetics also are considered valuable, the release says.”We knew there was possibility that Luna, our 10-year-old female, was pregnant, but it is also fairly common for wolves to experience pseudo pregnancies,” Dina Bredahl, animal care manager for Rocky Mountain Wild, said in the release. “Pseudo pregnancies exhibit the same behavioral and physical changes in the mother, so we were cautiously optimistic that this was an actual pregnancy. The keepers and I are thrilled that she has given us pups!”

Source: Litter of endangered Mexican gray wolf pups born at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo | gazette.com

Landowner Aims To Bring Wolves Back To Scotland, Centuries After They Were Wiped Out | Wyoming Public Media

When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in 1995, they had dramatic impacts on parts of Northwestern United States. Decades later, a wealthy landowner wants to try a limited version of that experiment — in the Scottish Highlands.Englishman Paul Lister is hoping to see the ancient Caledonian Forest of Scotch pine, alder and mountain ash regenerated, and wildlife long absent from the Highlands return. But as happened with the Yellowstone project, he’s running into strong opposition.

Source: Landowner Aims To Bring Wolves Back To Scotland, Centuries After They Were Wiped Out | Wyoming Public Media

A growing wolf population presents German politicians with a conundrum – Huffing and puffing

IN THE 20th century the wolves that populated German fairy tales—such as “Little Red Riding Hood”, published by the Grimm brothers in 1812—were an anachronism. Hunters had wiped them out over the course of the 19th century; the last was killed in 1904. For decades the animals were confined to Europe’s east. Then came the end of the cold war, improved forest conservation standards, tighter rules on hunting, and the demilitarisation of border zones. Grey wolves started moving west, crossing from Poland into Germany around the turn of the millennium.

Source: A growing wolf population presents German politicians with a conundrum – Huffing and puffing

France’s wolves are back. Now, can it protect its farmers? – CSMonitor.com

April 4, 2018 Dombrot-le-Sec, France—An icy rain whips through Benoît Gille’s wild gray hair as he rounds up his herd of 400 sheep with his wife, Ghislaine. Mud clinging to their boots, the couple pour hay into several troughs in fields tucked among the rolling green hills of the Vosges region in eastern France.It’s a picturesque, peaceful country scene – for now. But the threat of a wolf attack is always looming. Despite protective fencing and seven guard dogs, the Gilles have lost more than 60 sheep to wolf attacks in the last year, causing intense emotional and financial strain that has almost broken them.

Source: France’s wolves are back. Now, can it protect its farmers? – CSMonitor.com

Wolves Are Losing Ground to Industrial Logging in Southeast Alaska | Latest News | Earth Island Journal | Earth Island Institute

For 12,000 years, wolves have roamed Southeast Alaska’s rugged Alexander Archipelago — a 300-mile stretch of more than 1,000 islands mostly within the Tongass National Forest. Now, their old-growth forest habitat is rapidly disappearing, putting the wolves at risk. As the region’s logging policies garner controversy, a new study examines what the wolves need in order to survive.

Source: Wolves Are Losing Ground to Industrial Logging in Southeast Alaska | Latest News | Earth Island Journal | Earth Island Institute

American red wolf pups born at North Carolina Zoo – Greensboro – Triad Business Journal

Five American Red Wolves, a critically endangered species, have been born at the N.C. Zoo as part of the zoo’s red wolf breeding program.The pups, three females and two males, were actually born April 15 as storms and a tornado swept through the Triad.The pups remained unharmed throughout the turbulent weather, and their mother is also doing well. Four of the pups were named Thor, Thunder, Hurricane (Cane) and Typhoon (Ty). The fifth was named Oklahoma (Oakley) for the Oklahoma–shaped white mark on her chest.The zoo has nicknamed the pups the “Fab Five” and are the offspring Ayita (female) and Finnick (male), both 6 years old.

Source: American red wolf pups born at North Carolina Zoo – Greensboro – Triad Business Journal

Charges: Two Minnesota trappers snared wolves, bears, deer out of season, neglected to check traps – StarTribune.com

Two northern Minnesota trappers were charged with setting illegal wire snares and neglecting to check them, taking bears, wolves, deer and other wildlife over the course of two years.Brad Dumonceaux, 44, and Stephen Bemboom, 60, face over $70,000 in potential fines and jail time if found guilty to charges filed in Itasca County District Court last Friday.The snares used during the two-year investigation were larger than the state regulated 10-inch diameter and also lacked tag identification. State law states snares not capable of drowning the captured animal must be tended daily.

Source: Charges: Two Minnesota trappers snared wolves, bears, deer out of season, neglected to check traps – StarTribune.com