Fearing violence, officials cancel public meetings on managing Washington wolf packs | The Seattle Times

A motion-triggered wildlife camera near the den of the original Profanity Peak pack captures the family in 2016. Seven pack members were shot by Department of Fish and Wildlife after the wolves killed cattle on public land at the Colville National Forest.  (WSU wolf livestock research program)

State officials have canceled a series of public meetings about possible changes to the state’s wolf-management policy, citing fear of violence.

The Washington state Department of Fish and Wildlife had planned 14 public meetings from Spokane to Montesano to kick off a yearslong process of creating a new wolf-management policy, once wolves are no longer protected under the state and federal endangered species acts.

Instead, the department is hosting online webinars. The dates have not yet been announced.

via Fearing violence, officials cancel public meetings on managing Washington wolf packs | The Seattle Times

The Key Arguments for Both Sides of the Wolf Reintroduction Debate in Colorado | OutThere Colorado

Mexican gray wolf escapes

The debate over whether or not wolves should be reintroduced into Colorado’s landscape is a hot one right now. Both sides seem to have plenty of support behind how they feel from potential impact on the local ecosystem to whether or not humans will be at risk.

Here’s a quick breakdown of the arguments that each side tends to use in this debate.

via The Key Arguments for Both Sides of the Wolf Reintroduction Debate in Colorado | OutThere Colorado

Americans’ love of hiking has driven elk to the brink, scientists say | Environment | The Guardian

Increasing numbers of outdoor recreationists – everything from hikers, mountain bikers and backcountry skiers to Jeep, all-terrain vehicle and motorcycle riders, aren’t good for Elk populations.

Biologists used to count over 1,000 head of elk from the air near Vail, Colorado. The majestic brown animals, a symbol of the American west, dotted hundreds of square miles of slopes and valleys.

But when researchers flew the same area in February for an annual elk count, they saw only 53.

“Very few elk, not even many tracks,” their notes read. “Lots of backcountry skiing tracks.”

The surprising culprit isn’t expanding fossil-fuel development, herd mismanagement by state agencies or predators, wildlife managers say. It’s increasing numbers of outdoor recreationists – everything from hikers, mountain bikers and backcountry skiers to Jeep, all-terrain vehicle and motorcycle riders. Researchers are now starting to understand why.
via Americans’ love of hiking has driven elk to the brink, scientists say | Environment | The Guardian

Alberta considers expansion of ‘unethical’ wolf killing program: Conservation group | News

A conservation group is calling on Albertans to speak up to the provincial government — and demand that it to stop killing Canadian wolves in its efforts to recover the Woodland Caribou population before it’s too late.

via Alberta considers expansion of ‘unethical’ wolf killing program: Conservation group | News

Greene: Will Colorado roll out the red carpet for the gray wolf? | CanyonCourier.com

Ready or not, you could be approached by someone wielding a clipboard who wants to educate you about the Gray Wolves Initiative.

The plan will require Colorado’s Parks and Wildlife Commission to develop and implement a plan to reintroduce gray wolves to the state’s Western Slope. In 2020, voters could have the opportunity to weigh in on whether they are willing to bring back the apex predator that has been absent from Colorado since 1940.

Excitement elicited by June’s confirmed sighting of a lone wolf near the Wyoming border rippled through the state. However, many wolf biologists believe that waiting for wolves to independently return to Colorado to establish a sustainable population could take decades.

Wolves ran afoul of settlers in the early 1600s, and a bounty was declared in the colony of Massachusetts. In 1940, the last Colorado wolf was trapped and killed. But public sentiment began to pivot, and by the early 1990s, Americans began to recognize and value the wolf’s place in nature.

via Greene: Will Colorado roll out the red carpet for the gray wolf? | CanyonCourier.com

Wolf killed in Banff along Trans-Canada Highway – RMOToday.com

BANFF – A female wolf from the Bow Valley wolf pack was struck and killed by a vehicle along the Trans-Canada Highway in Banff National Park on Saturday (Aug. 10).

According to Parks Canada, the RCMP spotted the dead wolf along the eastbound lanes of the highway between the Sunshine Village access road and the Bow Valley Parkway interchange around 6:45 a.m.

“It had been hit sometime in the early hours of that morning because rigor mortis had set in a little bit,” said Dan Rafla, a human-wildlife co-existence specialist with Parks Canada.

He said it would have been difficult for the driver to spot the wolf because it was raining that evening and the wolf had black fur.
via Wolf killed in Banff along Trans-Canada Highway – RMOToday.com

Bears, alligators and red wolves get more space to roam in North Carolina | Wildlife & Nature | pilotonline.com

Buckridge Reserve

Bears, red wolves, bald eagles and alligators just got a bigger place to roam in eastern North Carolina.

The state purchased 2,224 acres known as the Woodley Tract in Tyrrell County, enlarging the Emily and Richardson Preyer Buckridge Coastal Reserve to nearly 30,000 acres of peat soils, wetlands and forests, according to a release from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality.

The cost to the state was $520,965. The landowner donated $117,200 of the value, said state spokeswoman Patricia Smith.

The Buckridge Coastal Reserve is part of nearly 350,000 acres set aside for wildlife habitat in the region that includes three national wildlife refuges in Dare, Hyde, Tyrrell and Washington counties.

via Bears, alligators and red wolves get more space to roam in North Carolina | Wildlife & Nature | pilotonline.com