El lobo era inocente: 20 investigados por cobrar ayudas por ataques falsos

Los daños provocados en el ganado por animales silvestres (lobos, osos, buitres…) son indemnizados en diversas comunidades de forma relativamente rápida y generosa. Con estas subvenciones o compensaciones, las administraciones públicas intentan reducir, por ejemplo, el rechazo de algunos colectivos sociales (como los ganaderos) a la recuperación o reintroducción de la fauna autóctona.Es de suponer que, en la mayoría de casos, las denuncias por ataques de fauna silvestre responde a incidentes reales pero desde hace años existen sospechas de que este sistema de compensación económica es aprovechado de forma fraudulenta.

Source: El lobo era inocente: 20 investigados por cobrar ayudas por ataques falsos

Wolves making faster comeback than expected in Washington state | king5.com

here are more wolves in Washington state than officials originally estimated. A lot more.In the most recent estimate from 2018, officials counted 24 packs. The state reports a growth rate of 30 percent per year. Sometimes it’s less; last year’s growth rate was just six percent.Wolf researchers and policy leads presented the findings to the state Senate Agriculture, Water, Natural Resources and Parks Committee on Tuesday.

Source: Wolves making faster comeback than expected in Washington state | king5.com

The Last Wild Caribou of the Lower 48 Has Been Placed in Captivity | Smart News | Smithsonian

Last April, conservationists were alarmed to discover that the South Selkirk caribou herd, the only surviving population that ranges into the contiguous United States, had been reduced to just three individuals. In the following months, one of the caribou was killed by a cougar, and another disappeared from researchers’ radar due to a tracking collar malfunction. So, in a final-hour effort to keep the herd alive, conservationists have moved the last known South Selkirk caribou into a captive breeding pen, as David Moskovitz reports for Science.

Source: The Last Wild Caribou of the Lower 48 Has Been Placed in Captivity | Smart News | Smithsonian

West Slope anti-wolf coalition forms | AspenTimes.com

Ranching, farming and wildlife advocates on the Western Slope are launching Stop the Wolf Coalition to oppose a wolf reintroduction that is building momentum in Colorado.This evening, the group is sponsoring a program on RFD-TV to present the case that wolves present a danger to humans, livestock, pets and wildlife.Richard Connell describes himself as the face of the Colorado Farm Bureau in western Colorado. His role has been in training and developing members to be advocates for agriculture and the issues they believe in.

Source: West Slope anti-wolf coalition forms | AspenTimes.com

Chill out: Wolves take snow days too, says study | CBC News

When snow falls, wolves chill out, according to a recent study from the University of Alberta.Over two winters, researchers looked at the movements of grey wolves near Fort McMurray, Alta. in conjunction with data on snowfall in the area.”We found that on the night that it was snowing, wolves rested more than they travelled, and when they travelled, they travelled slower than on other days when there wasn’t any snowfall,” Amanda Droghini, a former master’s student with the biology department.

Source: Chill out: Wolves take snow days too, says study | CBC News

Wolves expand their territory in Wisconsin

WEYAUWEGA, Wis. (WBAY) – DNR wardens continue searching for clues two weeks after a gray wolf was found illegally shot along Highway 10 near Weyauwega.DNR biologists say the adult female likely belonged to a pack in Waupaca County and is further evidence wolf territory in Wisconsin is expanding.DNR Regional Wildlife Biologist Jeff Pritzl says more of Wisconsin has become wolf country.”Just as we’ve seen with black bears in Wisconsin, I guess that line of awareness or that line that goes across the state of where we think that’s normal or unusual has been drifting south with wolves as well.”

Source: Wolves expand their territory in Wisconsin

Wildlife Commission to Finally Vote on Oregon Wolf Plan | Oregon News | US News

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon Fish and Wildlife commission is finally set to vote on a plan for managing wolves in the state, after years of contentious meetings.The commission is expected to vote in March, The Oregonian/OregonLive reported .As in other northwestern states, wolves have been controversial in Oregon, with ranchers saying they wreak havoc on livestock and conservationists saying they play a key role in the ecosystem.The main sticking point has been over when and how lethal action can be taken against wolves that kill livestock.The first wolf management plan was implemented in 2005 and revised in 2010, just a year after wolves made their return to Oregon after dispersing from packs in Idaho. The plan was supposed to be updated every five years, but the 2015 revisions became mired in argument and repeated delays ensued.

Source: Wildlife Commission to Finally Vote on Oregon Wolf Plan | Oregon News | US News