National Park Service – PEPC – Environmental Impact Statement to Address the Presence of Wolves at Isle Royale National Park

The National Park Service (NPS) has prepared a draft Environmental Impact Statement to Address the Presence of Wolves at Isle Royale (draft plan/EIS). Because your feedback is essential to the development of the EIS, we are asking for your thoughtful review and comments during the 90-day comment period, concluding March 15, 2017.The purpose of the draft plan/EIS is to determine whether and how to bring wolves to Isle Royale to function as the apex predator in the near term within a changing and dynamic island ecosystem. A decision is needed because the potential absence of wolves raises concerns about possible effects to Isle Royale’s current ecosystem, including effects to both the moose population and Isle Royale’s forest/vegetation communities.You are encouraged to comment on the draft plan/EIS through this website. Comments can be made by clicking on the “Open for Comment” link at the left side of this page and selecting the document and then clicking “Comment Now” button. You may also mail or hand-deliver your written comments to Superintendent Phyllis Green, Isle Royale National Park, ISRO Wolves, 800 East Lakeshore Drive, Houghton, Michigan 49931-1896.The NPS will schedule public meetings to be held during the comment period in the Great Lakes Region near the park. Dates, times, and locations of these meetings will be announced in press releases and on this site, see Meeting Notices on the left side of this page.As vital contributors to the planning process, we hope you take the opportunity to provide feedback, and if possible, join us at the public meetings. Thank you.

Source: National Park Service – PEPC – Environmental Impact Statement to Address the Presence of Wolves at Isle Royale National Park

Hugging with wolves: Chinese businessman spends ¥1 million a year on his passion for 150 wild animals | South China Morning Post

A 71-year-old businessman spends more than one million yuan (HK$1.12 million) each year on his 15-year passion – raising more than 150 wolves in a valley in northwestern China, mainland media reported.Yang Changsheng, of Changji prefecture in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, had used the income from his logistics company to subsidise the running of his wolf breeding centre, the news website News.ts.cn reported.

Source: Hugging with wolves: Chinese businessman spends ¥1 million a year on his passion for 150 wild animals | South China Morning Post

Conservationists widen toolkit for predator management | Berkeley News

The Berkeley study examined 66 published, peer-reviewed research papers that measured how four categories of lethal and non-lethal mitigation techniques — preventive livestock husbandry, predator deterrents, predator removal, and indirect management of land or wild prey — influenced attacks on livestock. The most consistently effective tools (showing 70 percent or greater effectiveness in at least two studies) were guard dogs, electric fencing, electrified fladry (electric fence with hanging colored flags), light and sound devices, shock collar, and removal of predators, which includes both killing and translocation to other places.

Source: Conservationists widen toolkit for predator management | Berkeley News

Hunter kills the last of the Druid wolves – Jackson Hole News&Guide: Environmental

When the wolf known as 778M was in his heyday atop the Blacktail Pack, competing canines that ventured into his territory in Yellowstone’s Northern Range weren’t likely to be greeted with submission.The unusually large alpha male was fiercely defensive and protective.“He would fight at the drop of the hat, and he was willing to run right into battle,” Yellowstone Wolf Project Biological Technician Rick McIntyre said.“In defense of his family and his territory,” McIntyre said, “he was very aggressive.”The size, aggression and smarts led 778M to a long, productive life, in wolf terms. At 9 1/2 years old, 778M was among the oldest known male wolves since the large carnivore species was reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park 21 years ago. Before being shot and killed by a Montana hunter last month, the big alpha was also the last living member of the Druid Peak Pack, which grew to an almost unheard of 37 animals, was witnessed by 100,000 visitors and helped make wolf-watching into big business.

Source: Hunter kills the last of the Druid wolves – Jackson Hole News&Guide: Environmental

Eight states get money to protect wolves | Outdoors | bozemandailychronicle.com

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced $900,000 in grants under the Wolf Livestock Demonstration Project Grant Program. Grants will be distributed to the states of Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington and Wisconsin.The grants assist livestock producers in undertaking proactive, non-lethal activities to reduce the risk of livestock loss from wolves, and compensate producers for livestock losses caused by wolves. The program provides funding to states and tribes, with federal cost-share not to exceed 50 percent.

Source: Eight states get money to protect wolves | Outdoors | bozemandailychronicle.com

New dog safety vest counters wolf attacks in eastern Finland | Yle Uutiset | yle.fi

Residents of the eastern town of Nurmes in Finland will be testing out a new invention designed to keep their pets safe next spring: A safety vest for dogs that contains chili cartridges.If a wolf attacks a dog wearing the vest and punctures the fabric, the cartridges release chili powder that sprays on the wolf’s face and mouth.Prototypes of the product were available already in 2014, but the actual vests will be trailed for the first time in Finland in the spring of 2017. People who have agreed to participate in the testing have been asked to keep a list of the pros and cons of the invention.

Source: New dog safety vest counters wolf attacks in eastern Finland | Yle Uutiset | yle.fi